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Heather Webb

Tall Poppies Review: ‘The Phantom’s Apprentice’ Sees an Unforgettable Retelling of a Classic

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Retellings can be challenging. For those who are avid fans, it can be a stretch to see beloved characters from a different perspective. Heather Webb, however, has created a retelling with a life of its own, making direct comparisons all but impossible. I jumped head first into this book and never once found the niggling of what I “know” of the story tugging at my subconscious. In The Phantom’s Apprentice, we experience the much loved story from the point of view of Christine Daaé. Though she’s still the naïve, somewhat gullible character at the beginning, Webb has done a masterful job at building Christine into, dare I say it, a more modern, self-aware and assured young woman. I loved that…

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Gaynor and Webb’s ‘Last Christmas in Paris’ Mixes Relationships and Tragedy

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At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week’s Tall Poppies review of Last Christmas in Paris relays a beautifully crafted story love and dreams in the wake of war human tragedy. War changes everything–individuals, relationships, priorities, dreams– so it’s not surprising that stories set in wartime are so popular and, in this case, so engrossing. In Last Christmas in Paris, best friends Will and Tom head off to fight the Germans, leaving behind Will’s sister, Evie, and, soon…

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Redeeming Josephine: Heather Webb and the Empress of the French

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When men write the history, how do women fare? In Josephine Bonaparte’s case, not very well, says author Heather Webb. In researching Becoming Josephine, her novel about the first Empress of the French, Webb read a number of male-generated tales of the Revolution-era femme fatale that she found incredulous—and far from flattering. Here is a sampling: She danced “nearly naked” for her wealthy powerful lover Paul Barras after political meetings that, at the stroke of midnight, became wild sexual orgies. When after 14 years of marriage, Napoleon told her they must divorce because he needed a male heir, Josephine screamed uncontrollably, then fainted.  One month after Napoleon’s defeat and exile in 1814, Josephine died—of a broken heart. When Napoleon heard…

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