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Abigail DeWitt: How Trump Killed My Taste for Profanity

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The top critical Amazon review of my last novel, Dogs, laments that “there was unnecessary use of the ‘F’ word.” The novel is from the point of view of a pot-smoking, shoplifting teenager in the 1970s. What did the reader expect? I laughed and figured I was in good stylistic company: I’d once heard Junot Diaz criticized on NPR for his “language,” and the radio host wasn’t talking about the rhythm of his sentences. In fairness to my Amazon critic, it isn’t only when I’m inside the mind of a fictional character that I’m drawn to profanity. I’ve loved swearing since I was a little girl. My father, who taught me to love good writing, swore like the Navy veteran…

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The To-Read Shelf on Goodreads Catalogues My Future Self

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As an avid reader, I adore using Goodreads. It’s the perfect place to organize all of my books and reviews, to place books on my to-read shelf, to vote in their annual book awards, and to get recommendations for the latest reads in genres I love. As an author, it’s also a great place to connect with readers, and to get the true pulse of what the reading community has to say about your work. No other site brings readers and authors together in quite the same way, breaking down barriers and allowing the whole literary community to take part in discussing their favorite books. Did I mention the to-read shelf? It’s one of my favorite features of Goodreads, as…

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Business Book Awards: 800-CEO-READ Announces Shortlist

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800-CEO-READ is a website dedicated to exploring and providing the very best business books for readers. They also hold an annual Business Book Awards where they acknowledge the top business books of the year. On the December 6, they announced this year’s shortlist, which includes the winning titles in eight different categories. The winner will be announced at an awards ceremony and celebration on January 12 in New York City. According to Editorial Director, Dylan Schleicher, the awards are looking to represent a more inclusive and human-driven approach to the business world. “You will see a broadening in the definition of what constitutes, ‘business,’” he writes on their website. This includes, “who business is meant to serve, and who should be allowed – even…

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Alexandra Kleeman’s ‘Intimations’: An Absurdist’s View of Costume Parties and Lobster Dinners

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When Alexandra Kleeman’s debut novel You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine released last year, I was lucky enough to be able to interview her on BookTrib. The buzz around her new book was palpable and it was unlike anything that I’d read before. The debut earned her comparisons to several literary heavy hitters like Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo. You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine was eerie, unsettling, whimsical and surreal. The aimlessness of the characters and their existential angst at times made me feel like I was swimming through several dreams at once, with ultra-violet advertisements dancing in the background with Kandy Kakes and late night infomercials for anti-aging creams. Events as mundane as a…

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Trend Alert! Girls Are On Fire — The Latest in Publishing

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One of the most popular title trends in the past few years has been to reference a woman’s position as it relates to her husband or father. We’ve seen The Time Traveler’s Wife, The Aviator’s Wife, The Memory Keeper’s Daughter, The Apothecary’s Daughter, The Bonesetter’s Daughter. Etc, etc, etc. But a recent article we read by Jocelyn McClurg made us realize that the tide is shifting. Instead of focusing on the wife or the daughter, book titles are now turning to ‘girls.’ Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo: ‘girls’ are everywhere in publishing these days. And sure, those particular titles are on the older side, but according to McClurg the trend is definitely…

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The 25 Beach Bag Books You Should be Reading — WIN a Bag FULL of Books!

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There’s nothing quite like being at the beach. Picture it, you’re lying in the warm sun, listening to the waves crash in front of you as the beautiful breeze keeps you cool; it’s pretty much every person’s dream day. The only thing that can make it even better is having the perfect beach read to really help you kick back and relax. Well, get ready because we’ve got the perfect list for all of those gorgeous summer beach days coming up. Here are 25 of the perfect books (in no particular order) that you definitely NEED to have in your beach bag. WIN 12 of the 25 amazing books below and a BookTrib Tote Bag!  Click the bag to ENTER: The Girls In The Garden…

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5 Mind-Bending Books to Read Before Wayward Pines Returns

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It takes a really great show to get me hooked like Wayward Pines did. Just when you think that life in this strange town is settling into normalcy the very last shot of the final episode reveals some deeply disturbing occurrences. I was completely sucked into this series the entire time and I ran out and bought all the novels by Blake Crouch the day after the series finale. Even after I finished those amazing reads, though, I found myself wanting more stories about futuristic, sci-fi, and dystopian communities just to keep me satisfied. I went on a hunt for new books in the same twisted vein as Wayward Pines but I found myself going back to classic books and short…

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The Top 10 May Books We Can’t Wait to Get Our Hands On

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The days are getting longer, the sun is out again, and flowers are starting to pop up here and there amid the newly green grass. May is upon us, and it looks like snowstorms and ski jackets are finally behind us. If we’re being completely honest, late spring makes us want to curl up with a good book in the sunshine while we wait for the hot, beach-filled days of summer to arrive. Luckily, there are tons of great new books coming out in May to satisfy all of our cravings. Here are the top 10 we can’t wait to get our hands on: The Trials of Apollo: Book One The Hidden Oracle, Rick Riordan (Disney-Hyperion, May 3) In his new middle grade…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books that are Both Visually Beautiful and Emotionally Moving

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I’m a visual person. I love “pretty” things. I love colorful things. So when I perused my many stacks of books on my desk for ideas for this week’s Heat Index, my eye was drawn to five gorgeous hardcover books sitting beautifully in a pile. I knew then, regardless of the topic, that these books needed to be in a list together. Then I read each synopsis and it was like the stars had aligned. Each book begins similarly by showing the protagonist’s current life, but the comfortable lifestyle each character was living is soon thrown completely off-course, leading them to situations and people they could have never expected. Old love, new love, suspense, thrill and the power that lies within a story itself…

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Shark Tank’s Daymond John Reveals His Business Reading List

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CEO of FUBU and Shark Tank shark Daymond John is no stranger to growing a business from the ground up and finding success. So what helped him along the way on his journey to becoming a business tycoon? John revealed in a Reddit AMA in February his top nine books that not only guided him but that he recommends to all business entrepreneurs. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill (The Ballantine Publishing Group, 1987) How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie (Pocket Books, 1998) Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson (G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1998) Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki (Plata Publishing, 2011) Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne (Harvard Business Review Press, 2015) The One-Minute Entrepreneur by Kenneth Blanchard,…

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These 3 British Comedies Will Tap into Your Emotional Side

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I love American television, but I’ll admit it: the Brits have figured out a magic television formula that we’ve never been able to quite match. It’s a combination of wry humor mixed with heartfelt moments that destroy you. My favorite British shows are the comedies; the ones you think won’t break you with emotions. But of course you’d be wrong. Here are three British shows—and one book!—to binge watch for the next time you want to laugh/cry your way through a rainy fall afternoon: Skins Skins is a teen show that switched up its cast every two years, creating all-new dynamics, issues, relationship, and teenage drama. It’s also one of the best high school shows ever made, delving deep into…

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Going Home: 3 Books About Discovering the Truth About Family

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Can you really go home again? This week Full Circle Bookstore in Oklahoma City recommends three books about protagonists who discover something unexpected about themselves and what family means to them. Full Circle was established in 1970 and is still going strong as the oldest and largest independent bookstore in Oklahoma. It also boasts the largest selection of books about Oklahoma in the state. Manager Dana Meister and bookseller Mary Robideaux recommend three books where the biggest surprises come from people they thought they already knew: The Art of Crash Landing by Melissa DeCarlo (Harper Paperbacks; September 8, 2015) “This is about a girl [Mattie] returning home to her mother, who she thinks is just an alcoholic and a deadbeat.…

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Tessa Hadley’s clever girl is just like us

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What happened to her? Where is she, we want to know.We wonder this as we read the latest from British novelist Tessa Hadley, whose Clever Girl (Harper, March) is narrated by Stella, who details the events of her life, from early childhood on. A first person narrator is of course not uncommon, but Hadley’s approach is a bit unusual as the narration occasionally shifts into the present tense, reminding us that somewhere Stella sits, an older woman looking back on her life and telling her story, from her girlhood in Bristol in the 1950s and 60s to the present. This literary device is part of what creates the tension in the book. The novel is somewhat episodic, true to real life…

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