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Gone with the Wind

Frightened and Flustered: The Books You Read Too Young

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article about some of your favorite novels as a teenager. Read on for more! A few weeks ago, an Early Bird Books meeting devolved into a passionate discussion about the books we stuffed under our mattresses, read by flashlight, and bought with our weekly allowances. Hilarity ensued. But after realizing our souls were similarly (and eternally) corrupted by Flowers in the Attic, we quickly realized we wanted to hear your answers, too. We were so excited to see your responses—yes, we did read all of them!—and hear about your innocent acts of bookish rebellion. While Judy Blume, VC Andrews, and Peyton Place seemed to have ruffled the most pre-tween feathers, there were a couple…

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5 of TV’s Most Lackluster Kisses & the Books that Did it Better

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Any romance lover knows that it’s all about the kiss. Maybe the couple is standing in the rain. Maybe one person is stroking the other’s face. Maybe they’re already tearing each other’s clothes off on the way to the nearest bed. Or, in a perfect world, it’s all three at once. (Hellloooo, Notebook.) But sometimes the kiss is just not good. The lips are getting jammed together awkwardly. There’s just no chemistry. You’re not always sure why, but a bad kiss is kind of like pornography: you know it when you see it. Regardless of the reason, here are the top five worst TV kisses and the books that did it better: Carrie & Big in an Elevator, Sex and…

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Is Gone with the Wind a classic or a chestnut from a more prejudiced time?

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This February marks the 75th anniversary of Gone with the Wind’s 1940 all-out Oscars grab. That year, the film won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Film Editing, Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography in Color, and Best Writing/Screenplay. Additionally, Victor Fleming took an Oscar home for Best Director. Vivien Leigh, who played Scarlett O’Hara, won Best Actress in a Leading Role. And, most importantly, given the film’s backdrop of America’s Civil War and Reconstruction eras, Hattie McDaniel took home an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, making her the first African American to be nominated for and win an Academy Award.   With the 2015 Oscars right around the corner, Gone with the Wind—a film often categorized…

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15 literature-inspired jack-o’-lanterns for Halloween

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Next week is Halloween, which makes this prime jack-o’-lantern carving time. But instead of the usual triangle eyes and toothy grin, why not try something a little different this year? If you’re anything like us at BookTrib, all the inspiration you need is currently sitting on your bookshelf. Here are 15 of our favorite literary pumpkins for 2014:   Harry Potter This pumpkin isn’t scaring anyone; it’s just too adorable. You might need to buy a little paint to pull this one off, but it’s worth it for his spiky hair alone.   Frankenstein A perfect likeness of Frankenstein’s monster. Plus he looks appropriately broody.   The Hobbit Love the image they captured of his back and that familiar logo.…

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What kind of flower are you? Six literary heroines and their floral alter egos

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A red rose means love. A daisy, innocence. A violet signifies faithfulness. Vanessa Diffenbaugh’s bestselling novel The Language of Flowers (Ballantine, 2011) sparked renewed interest in Victorian “floriography,” or flower symbolism. Recipients used floral dictionaries to decode the meanings of complicated “talking bouquets” and made floral arrangements to communicate feelings society would not permit them to say aloud. To celebrate spring, BookTrib offers a bouquet of seasonal blooms and their fictional counterparts. These female characters (and one real-life heroine) are no shrinking violets. Daffodil: Scarlett O’Hara (Gone with the Wind)  The daffodil, also called the narcissus, has several meanings in floriography. Sharing a name with a Greek character who falls in love with his own reflection, it’s no surprise that…

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How to be a Lizzie Bennet, Margaery Tyrell or Scarlett O’Hara bride

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Wedding season is fast approaching, and if you’re in the process of planning your own special day then you’ll soon find yourself facing thousands of difficult decisions. Should you invite that great aunt you barely remember? How mad will your sister be if you don’t make her Maid of Honor? Is there such a thing as too many mason jars? But perhaps the most important decision of all is The Dress. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Whether you want a small country wedding or something a little more off-beat, inspiration can always be found in your favorite novels. Here are six literary-inspired styles to help you find that perfect look on your wedding day: Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and…

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Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

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“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

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The star wore Prada: How great fashion can save a lackluster film

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Any book lover has had the unique experience of watching one of your favorite novels come to life on the big screen. It’s a moment filled with fear that the story will be butchered, forever tainting your view of the book, and awe that you’re finally seeing something you’ve only ever pictured in your mind. I’ve watched some truly awful adaptations of my favorite books (I’m looking at you, The Time Traveler’s Wife) and some truly amazing ones (hello, Princess Bride). But sometimes the beauty of a movie can triumph regardless of what’s happening in the story. A character will put on a certain dress or suit and make a scene pop in a way that didn’t seem possible in…

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I’d like an order of fashion with my literature, please

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After I got back one of my latest book edits, I noticed that my editor had crossed out about half a page. The note next to it said something like this: “unnecessary description.” And then, “I think you might be a little obsessed with clothes.” Well, she had me there. I am—as all of my friends and family can attest to—more than a little obsessed with clothes. But it’s not just that I have a lot of them (and I do, trust me). I also like to talk about them. I want to know where you got that shirt and those shoes, I check about ten different style blogs every day, and when I’m reading a book I have a…

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Screen romances for all your moods

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Nothing says “I love you” like watching someone you don’t know (i.e. a movie star) say it to someone else you don’t know (as in, another movie star). But we fall in love at the movies, with the movies, and sometimes we wish we could break the celluloid barrier and join (or break up) a happy couple. And luckily the silver screen gives us romance in all its forms, so here (in chronological order to avoid squabbling over rankings) is a 14-piece starter kit for your movie romance. If you’re into unrequited love, sweeping (fake) shots of Atlanta burning at the hand of those damn Yankees, and a heroine as feisty as they come, try Gone with the Wind (1939).…

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