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booktrib interview

Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

in Thrillers by

This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Debut Authors Amy Brewer and Patty Carothers on Collaboration and Writing a Happy Ending

in Fiction by

Rarely nowadays do we find books in the Young Adult genre that aren’t filled with death, murder, bullying, depression, and more. While books with these themes do hold an important place in literature, the market, after the success of books like 13 Reasons Why, has become saturated – if not over-saturated – with similar narratives and themes. Which is why reading the debut novel of friends and writing collaborators Patty Carothers and Amy Brewer feels like something of a breath of fresh air. Their debut work, Texting Prince Charming, as hinted at in the title, reads like a fairy tale – with a twist. After a tragic car accident, Shelby Ryan lost more than just her entire family – she’s also left…

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Harwood-Jones’ Journey Filled With LGBTQ Life Lessons

in Pop Culture by

Happy Pride Month! June was chosen as Pride Month to celebrate and commemorate the Stonewall riots in 1969, when the police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar, and sparked what turned into days of clashes and riots between the police, and members of the LGBTQAI community. The riots are largely considered to have been the defining moment that brought the fight for gay rights into the modern era. Pride parades, first started in 1970, the year after the riots, now take place across the world. Because at BookTrib we’re all about books and literature, we have one of our favorite interviews to share with you this month! Markus Harwood-Jones is coming out with two companion books this August: Romeo for…

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Interview with Maxine Rosaler, Author of “Queen for a Day”

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It is bold work to invite us into the world of children who are eligible for special education—and their long suffering parents. Maxine Rosaler does this in her novel, Queen for a Day, through her main character, Mimi Slavitt and her young son, Danny. We, the audience, are alongside Mimi as she attempts to accept and comprehend her autistic son’s world. In the process, Mimi — and so we the readers — are introduced to the other mothers and their children, whom she encounters along the path, and the social system that provides aid. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2015-2016, 6.7 million students between the ages of three and 21 received special education services. Among the…

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Sally Koslow on Fitzgerald’s Love Affair with Sheilah Graham in Her New Book, “Another Side of Paradise”

in Fiction by

It is always intriguing when an author shifts genres and offers us something very different – especially when the latest project captures our attention immediately and we declare ourselves followers of the writer. Sally Koslow, having written popular novels including The Late, Lamented Molly Marx, The Widow Waltz and Little Pink Slips that take place in real time, falls into this category. With the release of her first historical fiction novel Another Side of Paradise, Koslow engages her readers, drawing us into a memorable time in America for romance and female agency. From the moment we open this new work, we are transported into the life of Sheilah Graham, a woman born into poverty in England at the turn of the 20th…

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Joanna Cantor on Her Debut Novel, Yoga, and Writing About Grief

in Fiction by

This year, we’ve had some pretty standout books that have been published across the genres, but debut author Joanna Cantor’s novel Alternative Remedies For Loss has become one of the most talked about and beloved books, even though it was released just a few weeks ago. Though this is her debut, Cantor’s novel actually tackles some of the hardest things to write about clearly: the contradiction of life in your early 20s, where everything seems to be standing still yet happening too fast and all at once; grief and the feeling of permanent loss; and recovery, acceptance of our lives the way they are. And she manages to do all this effortlessly. Alternative Remedies For Loss focuses on 22-year-old Olivia, who, when…

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Charlie Donlea’s Fictional Answer to Crime Docu-Dramas

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Over the past few years, podcasts and television shows like Serial and Netflix’s Making A Murderer have taken over the country, if not the world. Thousands of people tune in every day to find out what happened next in these real-life cases where the question of did they or didn’t they pervades throughout the entire trial and beyond. Now, in a thriller unlike any other out there, Charlie Donlea has provided us with the book we didn’t even know we could have. Don’t Believe It is basically the literary answer to those true crime dramas: Sidney Ryan is a filmmaker, whose on-going docu-drama The Girl of Sugar Beach has taken over the country. Ten years previous in St. Lucia, Grace Sebold was arrested and convicted…

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Comic Thriller “Death and Taxes” Pits an IRS Repo Squad Against the Mongolian Mob, Radioactive Cows and a Murderous Eunuch

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Mark Douglas is an IRS accountant, a former Marine content to hide out in his cubicle and audit suspicious tax returns. His latent thirst for action is satisfied by occasional forays into the field, armed with tear gas, a bull horn, and a rental truck to haul in whatever pays the back taxes of the most egregious evaders. Life is good for Mark. After long days at the office courting carpal tunnel syndrome, he joins his co-workers at their local watering hole to relive past glories deciphering fraudulent tax returns, ponder unexpected consequences of tax loopholes, and ogle busty barmaids. Mark’s boss, Lila, is a beautiful and sexy tax prodigy. One day, she discovers “odd jiggles” in three seemingly unconnected…

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Blame It On Bianca Del Rio: The Drag Queen Says It All

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If you’ve never heard of RuPaul’s Drag Race, you’ve been living under a rock. Roy Haylock, also known as Bianca Del Rio, is the comedian and drag queen who not only won the sixth season of Drag Race, but has starred in several feature films (Hurricane Bianca: From Russia With Hate just came out), television series, and is now embarking on a third solo comedy tour that’s going all over the world. In addition to all of that, Bianca Del Rio also has a new advice book, Blame It On Bianca Del Rio: The Expert On Nothing, With An Opinion On Everything.  The book is divided into different categories, so readers will get to read the insane questions she gets asked and responds to…

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The Hype About New Psycho Thriller And Its Debut Author

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It’s one of the most talked about books, included on every list of recommendations, no matter what the occasion. Tangerine, the psychological thriller by debut author Christine Mangan, is not only beautifully written prose, but electric in imagery. Taking place in Tangier, Morocco, in the 1950s, the novel is vivid and full of heat, winding the characters up tighter and tighter as events around them begin to fall apart, only adding further to the feelings of claustrophobia and anxiety that are the hallmarks of every great thriller. Alice and Lucy used to be best friends and roommates, practically inseparable. But after an accident, the two haven’t spoken in over a year – which is why Alice is so startled when Lucy shows…

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Connect With Sara Wiseman’s “Messages from the Divine”

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Sara Wiseman is not only an award-winning author, but she’s been a spiritual teacher for years. Her latest book, Messages from the Divine, acts as a guide, showing us how to open up, and connect with others and the universe around us. The lessons themselves are timeless, and provide solutions for some of the most common questions that we have today, including things like living authentically, being happy with what we have, and more. Wiseman is a beautiful writer, and each chapter is filled with not only advice and wisdom, but hope. Unlike other books on spirituality, Wiseman doesn’t tell you that there’s one and only one way to find a spiritual path – instead, the guidance she offers is universal in…

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Cinderella Back by Popular Demand With a New Twist

in Fiction by

Since 1697, when the French author Charles Perrault wrote the fairy tale Cinderella, the story has hung around Western culture.  Little girls are its biggest fans, swooning at the beautiful gowns, the handsome prince, and a dream come true. Now here comes Slipper, Hester Velmans’ first adult novel, starring Lucinda as the luckless heroine who chases happiness through seventeenth-century England and Europe.  Born to a woman who had secretly wed an aristocrat and died in childbirth, Lucinda is an orphan who spends her childhood being batted back and forth between groups of cruel, wealthy relatives. Sound like someone you know?  The plot thickens.  After Lucinda receives a pair of glass-beaded slippers, bequeathed to her by her mother but which had…

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On Murder, the Gilded Age and Crime of the Century

in Nonfiction by

It was the original crime of the century. On June 25th, 1906, a shot rang out in Madison Square Garden, leaving of one of the greatest architects and most famous of New York’s socialites dead. Stanford White, who designed New York’s Washington Square Arch, Madison Square Garden and the Rosecliff Mansion, was murdered by millionaire Harry Thaw as hundreds of people watched in horror. Years before his murder, White had fallen in love with a young actress named Evelyn Nesbit, who seemed to return his attentions. But White had two sides to him and one night, he assaulted Nesbit horribly. Despite the attack, Evelyn Nesbit remained committed to White, falling even more deeply in in love with him – even after…

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Liam Callanan on Bookstores, Travel and Magic of Paris

in Fiction by

Who doesn’t love Paris? Whether it’s the language, the culture, the food, or just that element of je ne sais quoi, there’s something magnetic about the city. With so many different words that could be used, it’s telling that perhaps the most common word to describe the city is magic. And no one, it seems, understands that better than author Liam Callanan. His latest novel, Paris by the Book (Dutton), is set in city and thoroughly explores the ways that Paris not only changes you, but allows you to change within it. When Leah’s husband disappears, leaving behind only airplane tickets to Paris for her and their two daughters, Leah makes a spur of the moment decision and puts them all on the plane. There,…

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How to Recognize Emotional Abuse: A Chat with Avery Neal

in Nonfiction by

Emotional abuse is tough. Damaging on every level, emotional abuse, also called psychological abuse, doesn’t just take a toll on our mental state and our self-esteem, but it also impacts how we feel about ourselves and our relationships with other people. As we have seen in the media from victims who are coming forth in the wake of #MeToo, sometimes people in emotionally abusive relationships don’t actually realize that they’re in one, because the most common hallmarks we associate with abuse just aren’t there. There are no physical scars, the abuser relying on verbal and psychological attacks instead, which can be just as damaging in the long run.  Avery Neal, a psychotherapist and founder of the Women’s Therapy Clinic has…

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‘The Last Watchman of Old Cairo’ A Spellbinding New Novel Transports Readers to Egypt

in Fiction by

The latest novel from Michael David Lukas, The Last Watchman of Old Cairo (Spiegel & Grau) is a spellbinding novel that takes place in Cairo, Egypt and focuses on the Ezra Scroll— a legendary, perfect copy of the Torah written by the Prophet Ezra himself. Written across three different time periods, from three different perspectives, the result is an intricate history of Jewish people in Cairo and throughout Egypt. We got to talk with Michael David Lukas, who also wrote the bestseller The Oracle of Stamboul (Harper Perennial) about living in Cairo, discovering a little known history and the experience of writing three different time period from three different perspectives. BookTrib: Reading this, I felt like I was right there in Old Cairo, you…

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