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After I’m Gone

Are you there, Judy? It’s us, your fans

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As National Library Week draws to a close, BookTrib had the pleasure of talking to bestselling authors Laura Lippman and Megan Abbott about the importance of libraries and especially about the role this year’s Honorary Chair, Judy Blume, in their lives as writers and readers. Lippman’s current novel, After I’m Gone, is out now and Abbott’s next book, The Fever, will be out in June. When did you get your first library card? Do you still have it? Laura Lippman: My first library card was earned at the Garrison branch of the Baltimore City library system (aka the Enoch Pratt) after I learned to write my name, a la Rufus Moffat. I think you had to surrender the old one…

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To Harriet, on her 50th birthday: contemporary writers reflect on the influence of HARRIET THE SPY

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In the beginning, there were stories. Always stories. And with stories come writers. So begins Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 classic, Harriet the Spy:    Harriet was trying to explain to Sport how to play Town. “See, first you make up the name of the town. Then you write down the names of all the people who live in it. You can’t have too many or it gets too hard. I usually have twenty-five.”    “Ummmmm.” Sport was tossing a football in the air. They were in the courtyard of Harriet’s house on East Eighty-seventh Street in Manhattan.    “Then when you know who lives there, you make up what they do. For instance, Mr. Charles Hanley runs the filling station on…

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