AUTHORS

Dr Edward Hallowell



EDWARD M. HALLOWELL, M.D.
Genre: Memoirs

EDWARD M. HALLOWELL, M.D., is the bestselling author of Driven to Distraction and more than 20 books on attention deficit disorder and emotional well-being. In his celebrated new memoir, Because I Come From a Crazy Family, he turns an eye inward to his own life. He is a leading authority on ADHD, a world-renown speaker, the host of the podcast “Distraction,” and founder of the Hallowell Centers for Cognitive and Emotional Health in Boston, New York, San Francisco and Seattle. Visit http://www.drhallowell.com

BOOKS:

Because I Come From A Crazy Family: The Making Of A Psychiatrist (June 2018)

Driven to Distraction at Work: How to Focus and Be More Productive (January 2015)

SHINE: USING BRAIN SCIENCE TO BRING THE BEST OUT OF YOUR PEOPLE (January 2011)

MARRIED TO DISTRACTION: RESTORING INTIMACY AND STRENGTHENING YOUR MARRIAGE IN AN AGE IF INTERRUPTION (2010)

SUPERPARENTING FOR ADD: AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO RAISING YOUR DISTRACTED CHILD (2008)

CRAZYBUSY: OVERSTRETCHED, OVERBOOKED, AND ABOUT TO SNAP—STRATEGIES FOR COPING IN A WORLD GONE A.D.D. (2006)

POSITIVELY A.D.D.: PROFILES OF SUCCESSFUL ADULTS WHO HAVE A.D.D. (2006)

DELIVERED FROM DISTRACTION: GETTING THE MOST OUT OF LIFE WITH ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER (2005)

A WALK IN THE RAIN WITH A BRAIN (2004)

DARE TO FORGIVE: The Power of Letting Go and Moving On (2003)

CHILDHOOD ROOTS OF ADULT HAPPINESS:  Five Steps to Help Kids Create and Sustain Lifelong Joy (2002)

HUMAN MOMENTS: HOW TO FIND MEANING AND LOVE IN YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE (2001)

CONNECT: TWELVE VITAL TIES THAT OPEN YOUR HEART, LENGTHEN YOUR LIFE, AND DEEPEN YOUR SOUL (1999)

WORRY: CONTROLLING IT AND USING IT WISELY (1997)

ANSWERS TO DISTRACTION: Answers to the Most Commonly Asked Questions About Attention Deficit Disorder (1996)

WHEN YOU WORRY ABOUT THE CHILD YOU LOVE:  Learning and Emotional Problems in Childhood (1996).

DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood through Adulthood (1994)

FINDING THE HEART OF THE CHILD: Essays on Children, Schools and Families (1993)

WHAT ARE YOU WORTH?  Coming to Terms with Your Feelings about Money (1989)

Biggest literary influences:
Fyodor Dostoyevsky; John Milton; Samuel Johnson; William Shakespeare (of course); William Blake; William Butler Yeats; Thomas Wolfe; Ernest Hemingway; F. Scott Fitzgerald; Robert Frost; Tennessee Williams; Eugene O’Neill; George Orwell; Samuel Beckett; James Joyce; e.e. cummings; Walker Percy; Albert Camus

Last book read:
The Art of Grilling

The book that changed your life:
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. I have dyslexia, which means I read very slowly, but I savored every page of this very long novel. It was the first book that made ideas become vibrant, living, and utterly important for me. I fell in love with literature because of this book and decided I wanted to become a writer. Suddenly I had found my passion: to write!

Favorite literary character:
I guess it has to be Raskolnikov, because of Crime and Punishment, but there are so many close seconds: Meursault in L’Etranger; Binx Bolling in The Moviegoer; Yossarian in Catch-22; Nick in The Great Gatsby; Hamlet; Willy Loman; Pip; King Lear.

Currently working on: I have one for book on ADHD to write with John Ratey.  We are renaming the condition, because we do not see it as a disorder, rather as a trait. We’re calling it VAST, variable attention stimulus trait, a name suggested to us by Carrie Feibel. After that, I intend to write more books in the vein of “Crazy Family,” non-fiction narratives based on my work in psychiatry and my life in the world.

Words to live by: “Never worry alone. Always connect. And get a dog.”

Advice for aspiring authors:
Only write if you can’t not. It’s not a line of work for casualists. But if you have a passion for it, don’t be dissuaded by the long odds. What matters is producing the best work you can. Sales require luck and many other factors out of your control. Just do the best work you can, and let that be your reward. Nothing feels quite so good as a well-turned sentence.

Articles and Reviews:

What Are the Most Common Distractions at Work?  Business Insider

Manage Brain Overload in the Workplace – Staying focused at work is difficult  Wealthmanagement.com.

NY Times on CrazyBusy – http://www.drhallowell.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/NYTimesCrazyBusy1.pdf

NY Times on CrazyBusy – http://www.drhallowell.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/NYTimesMultiTasking.pdf

Harvard Business Review on Driven to Distraction at Work  – The Path to Peak Performance

Psychology Today  Developing Deep Attention: The Key to True Intimacy

Washington Post on ADHD Part 1 and Part 2

Wharton on Driven to Distraction at Work  http://worklife.wharton.upenn.edu/2015/04/focus-productive-dr-ned-hallowell/

Entrepreneur.com – There Are Always a Million Distractions. Here’s How to Silence the Noise and Pay Attention.

Go to Top