Family Bonds are Tested by Mental Illness in Mira T. Lee’s Debut, ‘Everything Here Is Beautiful’

In her new book Everything Here Is Beautiful (Pamela Dorman Books), author Mira T. Lee eloquently shows us when someone has a mental illness, it affects each person in the family and impacts all relationships.

Miranda and Lucia grew up very close, as loving sisters, Chinese-American girls from New York. When their mother dies, Lucia marries an unlikely match for her— a kind, Israeli man with one arm. After some time, though, Lucia leaves him and becomes involved with a younger Hispanic man, eventually having his child and moving with him to Ecuador, to live in a tiny hut with no bathroom, adjacent to his extended family.

Her behaviors are extreme, and even after she has ended up in the hospital, and given pills to keep her even-tempered, Lucia’s decisions are questioned by her sister, who struggled with how much she should interfere.

Miranda and both of the men in Lucia’s life offer her support and compassion in their own ways, bringing to light the fact that mental illness is only one aspect of a person, and no matter how flawed one is, love and belonging is still needed and deserved.

Everything Here is Beautiful is a messy family drama with lots of love, pain and forgiveness. A rich story about family bonds, sisterly love, devotion and responsibility in the face of mental illness and the potentially devastating and damaging consequences, Beautful is a powerful must read.

Everything Here is Beautiful is now available for purchase. For more information on Mira T. Lee, visit her website at miratlee.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Image courtesy of miratlee.com

Mira T. Lee‘s debut novel, Everything Here is Beautiful, was selected as an Indies Introduce title (Top 10 Debut for 2018) and Indie Next pick by the American Booksellers Association, and named a Top Winter/2018 Pick by more than 30 news outlets, including The Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, O Magazine, Poets & Writers, New York magazine, Chicago Review of Books, Seattle Times, Buzzfeed, Marie Claire, Real Simple, and Electric Lit, among others. Her short fiction has appeared in journals such as the Southern Review, the Gettysburg Review, the Missouri Review, TriquarterlyHarvard Review, and American Short Fiction, and has twice received special mention for the Pushcart Prize. She has been the recipient of an Artist’s Fellowship from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Missouri Review‘s Peden Prize.

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