Tag archive

myths

5 Myths About Depression We Need to Shut Down Immediately

in Potpourri by

Originally posted on Psychology Today. Depression, like art, can never be adequately described in words alone, though Andrew Solomon comes close in his memoir Noonday Demon. In it, he writes: “I felt as though I had a physical need, of impossible urgency and discomfort, from which there was no release—as though I were constantly vomiting but had no mouth. My vision began to close. It was like trying to watch TV through terrible static, where you can’t distinguish faces, where nothing has edges. The air, too, seemed thick and resistant, as though it were full of mushed-up bread.” Through metaphor and allegory, Solomon draws a vivid picture of the ineffable, as have writers and artists throughout history, from the paintings of Edvard Munch…

Keep Reading

Discovering Your Story’s Monomyth and Transforming a Character’s Journey

in Potpourri by

Every time I see an award show, I’m reminded about how much people love “the myth.” That’s the allegory; the handed down story that always affects people’s heart strings. The two myths that guarantee awards appear to be: first the story of Lazarus, where the hero rises from the dead — a perfect arc! You know the one where a man falls, crumbles, and then rises like a phoenix to success? And second, anything to do with World War II and heroes that save the fallen. Stories such as Shindler’s List, Casablanca, Sergeant York, Hail the Conquering Hero, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Lion, The Girl on the Train, The Goldfinch, are all stories of lost souls who fall, are broken,…

Keep Reading

Go to Top