Tag archive

Joe Wenke

Joe Wenke Interviews: Rita Mae Brown on being a Lambda Literary Pioneer

in Fiction by

This year’s recipient of the annual Lambda Literary Award’s Pioneer Award is bestselling author Rita Mae Brown. To celebrate her remarkable career, Bantam is reissuing her groundbreaking first novel, Rubyfruit Jungle. Recently, noted author and activist Joe Wenke (The Talk Show, The Human Agenda: Conversations about Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity) spoke to Brown about her writing, her latest accolade, and the future of the LGBT cause. JOE WENKE: Could you talk a little bit about what it was like for you to write Rubyfruit Jungle? In the introduction to Rita Will: Memoir of a Literary Rabble-Rouser, you say that for you writing “was a gift.” Was that what the experience of writing Rubyfruit Jungle was like? Was it a…

Keep Reading

Video: Missed It? Live Interview with Joe Wenke and The Human Agenda: Conversations about Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

in Non-Fiction by

In THE HUMAN AGENDA, LGBTQI advocate Joe Wenke speaks with some of the community’s leading change agents. In these wide-ranging and probing conversations, amazing people share their personal and professional stories along with their profound commitment to freedom and equality. GISELE ALICEA, (AKA GISELE XTRAVAGANZA) fashion model: “Transgender people are real people. We have mothers. We have fathers. . . .We have families. We have somewhere that we came from.”  ASH BECKHAM, speaker and advocate: “It’s really hard to not empathize with someone that you have a human connection with.” IAN HARVIE, comedian: “It is brave to be yourself.” DR. CARYS MASSARELLA, emergency physician: “Being transgender is not biologically hazardous.” CARMEN CARRERA, performer and fashion model: “We are one human…

Keep Reading

5 Plumes boast their favorite blooms

in Potpourri by

According to the calendar, spring has supposedly sprung. Personally, I think that someone needs to have a conversation with Mother Nature because the temperature display on my car’s dash is making me sad. But that is a rant for another day. Today, we appeal to Mother Nature’s literary aesthetic. We called upon some of our favorite authors to share their best blooms in hopes that Mother Nature will hear our call and finally remove the veil of winter. Steve Berry, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of The Patriot Threat “The Morning Glory. It blooms every day, in the morning, with the fresh sun.  Then, by mid to late-afternoon, it tires, withdraws within itself, and waits for the…

Keep Reading

What will it take to end discrimination against our 15,500 transgender service members?

in Non-Fiction by

It was certainly cause for celebration when President Barack Obama, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen certified congressional legislation to end “don’t ask, don’t tell” (DADT) and the discriminatory policy was terminated on September 20, 2011. However, the termination of the policy applied only to gay, lesbian and bisexual service people. Transgender people and intersex people are still banned from serving in the Unites States military, not by law but by military policy. Both groups of people are deemed unfit for military service not for any demonstrable deficiency in their ability to serve but solely because of their respective gender identities, which are pathologized by the military as disorders. There…

Keep Reading

Video: Missed It? Interview with Joe Wenke and The Talk Show

in Fiction by

Someone is following Jack Winthrop-most likely the gunman who tried to kill America’s most controversial talk show host, Abraham Lincoln Jones. Ever since that fateful night when Jones called Winthrop with his audacious proposal, life has never been the same. Winthrop, an award-winning New York Times reporter who calls the Tit for Tat strip club his second home, agreed to collaborate on Jones’ national “Emancipation Tour.” The plan is to bring Jones’ passion for radical change to the people and transcend television by meeting America face to face. Now Winthrop has to survive long enough to make the tour a reality.  As the reach of his stalker spreads, so does the fear that Winthrop’s unconventional family is also in danger-Rita…

Keep Reading

WIN: The Talk Show. Using the power of fiction to change hearts and minds

in Fiction by

Jack Winthrop, the main character of Joe Wenke’s new novel The Talk Show (Trans Über, 2014), is an award-winning New York Times reporter—and someone is trying to kill him. Throughout the novel, we watch as Winthrop lives his life amidst the seamy underbelly of New York City. We follow him to the Tit for Tat, the strip joint that serves as his second home. We meet Winthrop’s friends: Father Rita Harvey, the transgender ex-priest and LGBT activist; Donna, the stripper turned entrepreneur; Slo Mo, the Tit for Tat’s massive vegetarian bouncer; and Abraham Lincoln Jones, the outspoken media personality striving for radical change through his controversial “Emancipation Tour” across America. In short, The Talk Show isn’t your father’s hardboiled noir…

Keep Reading

Andrew Solomon and Dr. Joe Wenke discuss how our differences define us

in Non-Fiction by

Andrew Solomon is a writer and lecturer on politics, culture and psychology as well as an activist and philanthropist on behalf of LGBT rights, mental health, education and the arts. His latest book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, has won many awards, including the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction. His previous book, “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression,” won the 2001 National Book Award for Nonfiction JOE WENKE: Far From the Tree addresses a profound question: Is difference the foundation of human identity, even if the difference-making element is a disability or is widely denigrated or pathologized? In your opening chapter, “Son,” you make an extraordinary connection between your experience growing…

Keep Reading

Here’s to you, Mr. Mailer

in Fiction by

It’s high praise when Joan Didion declares you the only person capable of writing a particular story. This is a woman who knows from voice. In her review of Norman Mailer’s 1979’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Executioner’s Song, Didion says, “I think no one but Mailer could have dared this book. The authentic Western voice, the voice heard [here], is one heard often in life but only rarely in literature.” Mailer, who died in 2007 at age 84, helped spearhead a movement known as “new journalism,” a term often used to describe the work of Truman Capote and Tom Wolfe, wherein the storytelling techniques of a novel are grafted on to real life. It’s not quite fiction and it’s not…

Keep Reading

Go to Top