Death of a Century

Set in Hemingway’s Paris in the roaring twenties, Death of a Century: A Novel of the Lost Generation is a hardboiled mystery of WWI betrayal and intrigue.

The year is 1922. New York reporter and WWI veteran Joe Henry pays a visit to fellow reporter and army buddy Wynton Gresham. But upon his arrival, Joe finds Wynton dead on his sofa with two bullet holes in his chest. Unanswered questions begin to pile up: Wynton’s recently finished manuscript has gone missing, three Frenchmen lie dead in a car less than a mile from Wynton’s home, and a trunk full of Wynton’s clothes sit neatly packed in his bedroom.

The sheriff immediately regards Joe as the prime suspect, so when Joe discovers a first-class ticket on a Cunard liner leaving for France the following day, he decides to steal away under Wynton’s identity. In Paris, Joe hopes to clear his name and find the man responsible for his friend’s murder while evading his own. But returning to France brings back memories of war and the atrocities he witnessed. With the help of other broken veteran expats of Hemingway’s Lost Generation, however, Joe is able to find hope in a world irrevocably altered by war. 

Death of a Century includes surprise appearances by Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, and Fitzgerald, among others. Robinson paints a story that is at once innovative and spellbinding, sure to keep readers entertained until the very last page.

Meet the Author

DANIEL ROBINSON is an award-winning novelist. His first career fighting wildfires for fourteen years served as the inspiration and basis for his first novel, After the Fire. He went on to win the Clay Reynolds Novella Prize for his Depression-era noir, The Shadow of Violence. Robinson has a PhD from the writing program at the University of Denver and has published numerous articles about Hemingway and the post-WWI Lost Generation. He lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, where he teaches American literature and runs a small historical collectibles business.

You can visit his website at http://www.danielrobinsonbooks.com.

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