In Praise of American Educators: And How They Can Become Even Better

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  Critique the commonly presented media messages about schooling in America. Consider the evidence for why the present generation of American educators has accomplished more than previous generations. Evaluate the assumptions driving policies set up to improve schooling. Discover the four essential pillars of the PLC foundation. Learn the essential elements of the PLC process and common mistakes in implementing that process Explore the state of education today. In this thought-provoking book, the author presents a compelling case for why contemporary American educators are the greatest generation in history. He carefully explains why current national reform policies have failed and presents specific steps policymakers, administrators, and teachers must take to transform American schools to meet student needs in the 21st…

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No Such Thing as a Free Gift: The Gates Foundation and the Price of Philanthropy

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Philanthro-capitalism: How charity became big business The charitable sector is one of the fastest-growing industries in the global economy. Nearly half of the more than 85,000 private foundations in the United States have come into being since the year 2000. Just under 5,000 more were established in 2011 alone. This deluge of philanthropy has helped create a world where billionaires wield more power over education policy, global agriculture, and global health than ever before. Charities link the farmers in Africa to the boardrooms of corporate foundations and the corridors of the World Economic Forum at Davos. Far from being selfless, plutocratic philanthropy may be the ultimate profit-making tool. In No Such Thing as a Free Gift, author and academic Linsey McGoey…

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Living a Life that Matters: A Memoir of the Marquis de Lafayette

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David Weitzman has written the only first-person account of the life and revolutionary times of Gilbert du Motier—better known as the Marquis de Lafayette. Weitzman faithfully renders the color and spirit of revolutionary times in this historically accurate account of the events and relationships the young nobleman entered and formed on his path to become a well-respected fighting commander and right-hand man to General George Washington, who regarded this special French ally “Like my own son.” “Living a Life That Matters” is the product of careful scholarship and equally careful construction by the articulate and witty Weitzman. No one who professes feelings for the beginnings of this country will want to miss the opening scenes of the American experiment in…

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Privileged Attorneys: Las Vegas Style (eBook)

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Lawyers can’t be funny but Privileged Attorneys proves that adage wrong. A situation inside the Brothers-at-Law office evolves as a heated competition unfolds between the three brothers. Ted, their father and head of the firm is retiring and is forced to pick one of his sons to replace him. Not wanting to show favorites, Ted concocts a contest and the winner takes all- head of the firm which comes with a huge trust fund. The once peaceful office is turned upside down as the three brothers try to outdo each other and win the contest. Humor reigns supreme in their quest, but tears, anger, love and revenge are sprinkled into the plot. Meet the Author: ARLENE KRIEGER received a BA…

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The Fifth Letter

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Sometimes you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. Such is the position in which Associate Supreme Court Justice Katherine Helena Ross, the first black female on the U.S. Supreme Court, finds herself in “The Fifth Letter,” the new political thriller by author Vivian Carpenter. Rooted in the historical treatment of Blacks in the United States, Justice Katherine Ross struggles to do what is right as her mother’s 1940s memoir influences her actions and emotions. Once on the Court, Katherine gains the power to ignite an involuntary retirement process to remove conservative Justice John Galt from the bench after the U.S. Constitution is amended to create an involuntary retirement process for incapacitated justices. John Galt, an outspoken egoist,…

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The Meursault Investigation

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He was the brother of “the Arab” killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus’s classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling’s memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: he gives his brother a story and a name—Musa—and describes the events that led to Musa’s casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny beach. In a bar in Oran, night after night, he ruminates on his solitude, on his broken heart, on his anger with men desperate for a god, and on his disarray when faced with a country that has so disappointed him. A stranger among his own people, he wants to be granted, finally, the right to…

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America 1844: Religious Fervor, Westward Expansion, and the Presidential Election That Transformed the Nation

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The presidential election of 1844 was one of the two or three most momentous elections in American history. Had Henry Clay won instead of James K. Polk, we’d be living in a very different country today. Polk’s victory cemented the westward expansion that brought Texas, California, and Oregon into the union. It also took place amid religious turmoil that included anti-Mormon and anti-Catholic violence, and the “Great Disappointment,” in which thousands of followers of an obscure preacher named William Miller believed Christ would return to earth in October 1844. Author and journalist John Bicknell details even more compelling, interwoven events that occurred during this momentous year: the murder of Joseph Smith, the religious fermentation of the Second Great Awakening, John…

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The US Congress for Kids: Over 200 Years of Lawmaking, Deal-Breaking, and Compromising

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An interactive guidebook to the history and inner workings of the legislative branch of the U.S. Government Providing a historical perspective on all that is going on today, US Congress for Kids examines the major milestones in congressional history, including the abolition of slavery, extending the vote to African Americans and to women, and investigating misconduct in both government and private institutions. Kids will be engaged by the focus on dramatic stories, personalities, and turning points while also benefitting from the clear discussions of Congressional purpose, structure, history, and ongoing issues. Educational, hands-on activities that illuminate the workings of the U.S. Congress include making a House ceremonial mace, creating congressional money, making a capitol dome, and designing a Congressional Medal of Honor.…

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Please Stop Helping Us

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Why is it that so many efforts by liberals to lift the black underclass not only fail, but often harm the intended beneficiaries? In Please Stop Helping Us, Jason L. Riley examines how well-intentioned welfare programs are in fact holding black Americans back. Minimum-wage laws may lift earnings for people who are already employed, but they price a disproportionate number of blacks out of the labor force. Affirmative action in higher education is intended to address past discrimination, but the result is fewer black college graduates than would otherwise exist. And so it goes with everything from soft-on-crime laws, which make black neighborhoods more dangerous, to policies that limit school choice out of a mistaken belief that charter schools and…

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House of Cards

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“This blood and thunder tale, lifelike and thoroughly cynical, certainly carries the ring of authenticity….a great triumph.” — The Independent The #1 bestselling novel that inspired the hit Netflix series A dark tale of greed, corruption, and unquenchable ambition, House of Cards reveals that no matter the country, politics, intrigue and passion reign in the corridors of power. Francis Urquhart has his hand on every secret in politics—and is willing to betray them all to become prime minister. Mattie Storin is a tenacious young reporter who has a knack for finding the real stories hidden behind the spin. When she stumbles upon a scandalous web of intrigue and financial corruption at the very highest levels, she vows to reveal the…

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Dead Wrong

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When a top secret program of implanting harrowing memories into innocent people comes to light, neurosurgeon Tom McCarthy is literally caught in the crossfire.  While McCarthy looks forward to a three day weekend, his office is suddenly raided by two Department of Defense investigators bent on arresting him for a crime he didn’t commit. All hell breaks loose when an inadvertent scuffle escalates, leaving one agent dead at the hands of the other, and McCarthy fleeing but hopelessly trapped inside the labyrinthine corridors, heating ducts, and stairways of a gigantic Seattle medical center. With the CIA and Seattle PD closing in, McCarthy unwittingly pulls Dr. Sarah Hamilton into the fray. And like rats in a maze, they struggle to stay…

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The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism

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In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism. Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now taking it to its death—the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that drives productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services in order to win over consumers and market share. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs…

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Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?

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In his bestselling book The World Without Us, Alan Weisman considered how the Earth could heal and even refill empty niches if relieved of humanity’s constant pressures. Behind that groundbreaking thought experiment was his hope that we would be inspired to find a way to add humans back to this vision of a restored, healthy planet-only in harmony, not mortal combat, with the rest of nature.

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