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The Interior Circuit: A Mexico City Chronicle

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Dispatched from a city wracked by high-level corruption scandals and massive popular protests calling for justice culminating around the disappearance of forty-three college students in Guerrero, Mexico,  Francisco Goldman’s THE INTERIOR CIRCUIT (Grove Press; July 7, 2015) is a timely, provocative, and kaleidoscopic journey into the heart of Mexico City that fuses a personal journey to a multi-layered investigation of one of the world’s most remarkable and often misunderstood great cities. Balancing memoir and reportage, Goldman begins with a story of enrolling in driving lessons, both to overcome his fear of the anarchic chaos of Mexico City traffic, and  to mark the fifth anniversary of the tragic loss of his wife, a native of the city. As he emerges from his…

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Flying Colors

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Victor Vic Tatelman was a cadet in Visalia, California when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. A chilling anger along with undeniable feelings of retribution filled the air, and Vic, just like the other Cadets, looked for the opportunity to pay back. Vic flew more than 120 missions, serving two tours of duty, first in the Pacific in World War II, and then again in the Pacific during the Korean War, having earned may Air Medals, two DFC (Distinctive Flying Crosses), and one Purple Heart. In 1947, He joined the Reserves. Among many assignments, he worked at the Pentagon, retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel. He was responsible for the development and training of other cadets in the deployment of the new sophisticated…

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When the Diamonds Were Gone

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CHICAGO: After a grueling and dramatic escape from occupied Poland in 1939, eight-year-old Julian and his mother arrive penniless in America in 1941 with big plans. Julian’s beautiful, former socialite mother Barbara wants to regain her former social status, while Julian just wants to fit his war-ravaged psyche into the American way of life. As Barbara climbs her social ladder, she succeeds in opening doors for herself but, in the process, slams shut the doors of opportunity for her son.   The story of an insecure, war damaged kid plopped into the American way of life, When the Diamonds Were Gone (Academy Chicago Publishers; July 2015) tells of the thirteen years Julian Padowicz spent struggling to catch up to his…

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Second Street Station: A Mary Handley Mystery

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Set in late nineteenth century New York, SECOND STREET STATION centers on Mary Handley, a brilliant, beautiful, and daring young woman. Breaking from societal expectations for women during this time-period, Mary is a self-sufficient, independent thinker and wants to achieve more than just becoming some man’s wife. She has studied ju-jitsu and other forms of self-defense from when she was a young girl. At first, it was to avoid childhood bullies, but these skills have come in handy as she has grown to adulthood. Her dream is to be a detective, and in preparation for it, she has read every book she can find on the subject, including ones about the emerging science of forensics. Mary gets a chance at…

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The Fifth Letter

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Sometimes you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. Such is the position in which Associate Supreme Court Justice Katherine Helena Ross, the first black female on the U.S. Supreme Court, finds herself in “The Fifth Letter,” the new political thriller by author Vivian Carpenter. Rooted in the historical treatment of Blacks in the United States, Justice Katherine Ross struggles to do what is right as her mother’s 1940s memoir influences her actions and emotions. Once on the Court, Katherine gains the power to ignite an involuntary retirement process to remove conservative Justice John Galt from the bench after the U.S. Constitution is amended to create an involuntary retirement process for incapacitated justices. John Galt, an outspoken egoist,…

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Blue Gemini: A Thriller

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The year is 1968: The Cold War is far from over, nuclear annihilation is always only a heartbeat away. America is racing the Soviet Union to land men on the Moon, a war is raging, and a pivotal presidential election looms on the horizon. A child of the early space age, Lieutenant Scott Ourecky joined the Air Force with aspirations of going to flight school. A brilliant engineer, he repeatedly fails the aptitude test to become a pilot but is selected to work on a highly classified military space program—the innocuously named Aerospace Support Project—in which Air Force astronauts are slated to fly missions to intercept and destroy suspect Soviet satellites. When one of the astronauts in training abruptly falls…

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Death of a Century

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Set in Hemingway’s Paris in the roaring twenties, Death of a Century: A Novel of the Lost Generation is a hardboiled mystery of WWI betrayal and intrigue. The year is 1922. New York reporter and WWI veteran Joe Henry pays a visit to fellow reporter and army buddy Wynton Gresham. But upon his arrival, Joe finds Wynton dead on his sofa with two bullet holes in his chest. Unanswered questions begin to pile up: Wynton’s recently finished manuscript has gone missing, three Frenchmen lie dead in a car less than a mile from Wynton’s home, and a trunk full of Wynton’s clothes sit neatly packed in his bedroom. The sheriff immediately regards Joe as the prime suspect, so when Joe…

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The Patriot Threat

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The 16th Amendment to the Constitution is why Americans pay income taxes. But what if there were problems associated with that amendment? Secrets that call into question decades of tax collecting? In fact, there is a surprising truth to this hidden possibility.  To read the full article And to enter to win a copy CLICK HERE

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The Final Recollection of Charles Dickens

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England, 1870: His health failing, his most important work all but done, Charles Dickens is readying for the final bed. But there is one more story that he must tell. The Final Recollections of Charles Dickens blends a historically-accurate telling of Dickens’s life with a gripping portrait of betrayal, murder, corruption, obsession, and love. It’s the story of Dickens’s coming of age, caught between the worlds of England’s ruling elite and the seamy underside of London society. The novel captures a full range of Dickensian characters: Dickens; the hauntingly beautiful Amanda Wingate; Geoffrey Wingate, Amanda’s scheming financial-swindler husband; and Florence Spriggs, a mutilated prostitute whose once-lovely face has been carved into a mask of horror. Meticulously researched and masterfully told, The Final…

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Fashion Victims

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This engrossing book chronicles one of the most exciting, controversial, and extravagant periods in the history of fashion: the reign of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette in 18th-century France. Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell offers a carefully researched glimpse into the turbulent era’s sophisticated and largely female-dominated fashion industry, which produced courtly finery as well as promoted a thriving secondhand clothing market outside the royal circle. She discusses in depth the exceptionally imaginative and uninhibited styles of the period immediately before the French Revolution, and also explores fashion’s surprising influence on the course of the Revolution itself. The absorbing narrative demonstrates fashion’s crucial role as a visible and versatile medium for social commentary, and shows the glittering surface of 18th-century high society as well…

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That Boy from Nazareth

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Set in ancient Palestine during the dangerous Roman occupation and Jewish rebellion, That Boy from Nazareth weaves a suspenseful coming-of-age adventure in which God reveals to a young Jesus his true identity as the Son of God. Powerful opposing forces pursue him using any means necessary to find the boy and either kill him or use him for their own nefarious purposes. Rich with captivating detail, this compelling, fast-paced adventure, told through the characters who later define Jesus’ life in the Gospels, is filled with suspense, humor, and intriguing dialogue that lend a new and real sense of humanity to the story of how a twelve-year-old boy from a humble family in a Galilean town was given the power to change…

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When Books Went to War

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When Nazi Germany began invading neighboring countries in the 1930s it not only declared war on freedom, liberty, and tolerance—it declared war on the printed page as well. By 1941, the Nazis had banned and burned more than 100 million books and had driven terrified citizens to hide or destroy many more. But as the United States entered the war, books fought back. To read the full article and to enter to win a copy CLICK HERE

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Of All the Gin Joints

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True tales of celebrity hijinks are served up with an equal measure of Hollywood history, movie-star mayhem, and a frothy mix of forty cocktail recipes. Humphrey Bogart got himself arrested for protecting his drinking buddies, who happened to be a pair of stuffed pandas. Ava Gardner would water-ski to the set of Night of the Iguana holding a towline in one hand and a cocktail in the other. Barely legal Natalie Wood would let Dennis Hopper seduce her if he provided a bathtub full of champagne. Bing Crosby’s ill-mannered antics earned him the nickname “Binge Crosby.” And sweet Mary Pickford stashed liquor in hydrogen peroxide bottles during Prohibition. From the frontier days of silent film up to the wild auteur period of…

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My Pearl Harbor Scrapbook 1941

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My Pearl Harbor Scrapbook, 1941. A Nostalgic Collection of Memories unravels the momentous event of one of America s greatest tragedies, the attack on Pearl Harbor from its early Japanese inception, through the attack and its devastating aftermath. With the look and feel of a WWll period scrapbook, each two-page spread illuminates a specific aspect of the Pearl Harbor story with the use of hundreds of original photographs, maps, telegrams, newspaper clippings, hand-typed notes and letters. The use of captivating design elements engage the reader to gain a well-rounded picture of what life was like at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii before, during and after December 7,1941. Each overflowing detailed page offers a unique hands-on exploration of this well-known story. Told in bite-sized…

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Against the Tide

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Former Pentagon official Ashton Carter has been identified as Chuck Hagel’s successor. If all goes as expected and President Barack Obama confirms Carter’s appointment, he’ll soon take over the office of defense secretary. To read more and enter to win a copy Click HERE

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Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside

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Heisman Trophy winners Glenn Davis and Felix Blanchard—renowned during their playing days at West Point as “Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside”—were the best-known college football players in the country between 1944 and 1946, and Army was the nation’s top-ranked team under legendary coach Red Blaik. Acclaimed author Jack Cavanaugh takes readers through the Black Knights’ three consecutive National Championship seasons, including the 1946 “Game of the Century” between Army and Notre Dame, the only college game to date to have included four Heisman Trophy winners.  Cavanaugh also examines the impact the war had on Army’s success—because its players were already considered to be in the military and thus deferred from active duty while students at West Point, Army featured many…

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