The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic

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Born Betsy Bowen into grinding poverty, the woman who reinvented herself as Eliza Jumel was raised in a brothel, indentured as a servant, and confined to a workhouse when her mother was in jail. Seizing opportunities and readjusting facts to achieve the security and status she so desperately craved, she obtained a fortune from her first husband, a French merchant, and nearly lost it to her second, the notorious vice president Aaron Burr. Divorcing Burr promptly amid lurid charges of adultery, she lived on triumphantly to the age of ninety, astutely managing her property and public persona. By the end of her life, “Madame Jumel” was one of New York’s richest women, with servants of her own, an art collection,…

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Katrina Ten Years After

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A decade ago Hurricane Katrina rocked Louisiana, Mississippi, and the whole country. Now Katrina Ten Years After explores the devastation and the aftermath with personal stories and photographs, socio-economic analysis, and tales of rebuilding a community. This book tells the truth about the resiliency of the people of the area, buffeted by not only a storm but by the Great Recession over the last decade. The rebuilding of the area is a reflection of who we are in the South. There was a great amount of generosity, but there were also conflicts between classes and ethnic groups over the spoils of aid funds. Among the chapters is the story of the Lower Ninth Ward’s struggle to rebuild, the environmentally concerned…

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Sorcerer to the Crown: A Sorcerer Royal Novel

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In this sparkling debut, magic and mayhem clash with the British elite… The Royal Society of Unnatural Philosophers, one of the most respected organizations throughout all of England, has long been tasked with maintaining magic within His Majesty’s lands. But lately, the once proper institute has fallen into disgrace, naming an altogether unsuitable gentleman—a freed slave who doesn’t even have a familiar—as their Sorcerer Royal, and allowing England’s once profuse stores of magic to slowly bleed dry. At least they haven’t stooped so low as to allow women to practice what is obviously a man’s profession… At his wit’s end, Zacharias Wythe, Sorcerer Royal of the Unnatural Philosophers and eminently proficient magician, ventures to the border of Fairyland to discover…

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The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century

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What do thousands of kids, makers, poets, artists, steampunks, hipsters, activists, and musicians have in common? They love typewriters―the magical, mechanical contraptions that are enjoying a surprising second life in the 21st century, striking a blow for self-reliance, privacy, and coherence against dependency, surveillance, and disintegration. The Typewriter Revolution documents the movement and provides practical advice on how to choose a typewriter, how to care for it, and what to do with it―from National Novel Writing Month to letter-writing socials, from type-ins to typewritten blogs, from custom-painted typewriters to typewriter tattoos. It celebrates the unique quality of everything typewriter, fully-illustrated with vintage photographs, postcards, manuals, and more.   Meet the Author RICHARD POLT is the creator and webmaster of The Classic Typewriter…

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Falafel Nation: Cuisine and the Making of National Identity in Israel (Studies of Jews in Society)

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When people discuss food in Israel, their debates ask politically charged questions: Who has the right to falafel? Whose hummus is better? But Yael Raviv’s Falafel Nation moves beyond the simply territorial to divulge the role food plays in the Jewish nation. She ponders the power struggles, moral dilemmas, and religious and ideological affiliations of the different ethnic groups that make up the “Jewish State” and how they relate to the gastronomy of the region. How do we interpret the recent upsurge in the Israeli culinary scene—the transition from ideological asceticism to the current deluge of fine restaurants, gourmet stores, and related publications and media? Focusing on the period between the 1905 immigration wave and the Six-Day War in 1967, Raviv explores…

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In Praise of American Educators: And How They Can Become Even Better

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  Critique the commonly presented media messages about schooling in America. Consider the evidence for why the present generation of American educators has accomplished more than previous generations. Evaluate the assumptions driving policies set up to improve schooling. Discover the four essential pillars of the PLC foundation. Learn the essential elements of the PLC process and common mistakes in implementing that process Explore the state of education today. In this thought-provoking book, the author presents a compelling case for why contemporary American educators are the greatest generation in history. He carefully explains why current national reform policies have failed and presents specific steps policymakers, administrators, and teachers must take to transform American schools to meet student needs in the 21st…

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Last Act: The Final Years and Emerging Legacy of Ronald Reagan

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His name in American politics is more cited than any other president. Both the Republican and Democratic parties are radically different today, mainly as a result of Ronald Reagan and the force of his ideas. No twentieth century president shaped the American political landscape so profoundly. Craig Shirley’s Last Act is the important final chapter in the life of Reagan that no one has thus far covered. It’s the kind of book that widens our understanding of American history and of the presidency and the men who occupied it. To tell Reagan’s story, Craig has secured the complete, exclusive, and enthusiastic support of the Reagan Foundation and Library and spent considerable time there reviewing sealed files and confidential information. Cast in…

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Living a Life that Matters: A Memoir of the Marquis de Lafayette

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David Weitzman has written the only first-person account of the life and revolutionary times of Gilbert du Motier—better known as the Marquis de Lafayette. Weitzman faithfully renders the color and spirit of revolutionary times in this historically accurate account of the events and relationships the young nobleman entered and formed on his path to become a well-respected fighting commander and right-hand man to General George Washington, who regarded this special French ally “Like my own son.” “Living a Life That Matters” is the product of careful scholarship and equally careful construction by the articulate and witty Weitzman. No one who professes feelings for the beginnings of this country will want to miss the opening scenes of the American experiment in…

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The Columbus Code

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When Christopher Columbus set out to discover the New World, was it because he wanted to serve the king and queen of Spain or because he wanted to escape them? Did he have stronger ties to Jerusalem than anyone suspected? Was Columbus actually a Jew fleeing the Spanish Inquisition? And could uncovering those secrets prevent international disaster in a world of terrorism today? Secret Service agent John Winters is determined to find the answers in this riveting novel based on recent scholarly discoveries. In The Columbus Code, Middle East historian and New York Times best-selling author Mike Evans uses rich story to unscramble a historical puzzle and remind us how the past is always a part of who we are.…

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Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad

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National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson delivers a brilliant and riveting account of the Siege of Leningrad and the role played by Russian composer Shostakovich and his Leningrad Symphony. In September 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history—almost three years of bombardment and starvation that culminated in the harsh winter of 1943–1944. More than a million citizens perished. Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, their relatives having neither the means nor the strength to bury them. Residents burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and—eventually—one another to stay alive. Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet…

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The Occupation Trilogy: La Place de l’Étoile – The Night Watch – Ring Roads

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Born at the close of World War II, 2014 Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano was a young man in his twenties when he burst onto the Parisian literary scene with these three brilliant, angry novels about the wartime Occupation of Paris. The epigraph to his first novel, among the first to seriously question Nazi collaboration in France, reads: “In June 1942 a German officer goes up to a young man and says: ‘Excuse me, monsieur, where is La Place de l’Étoile?’ The young man points to the star on his chest.” The second novel, The Night Watch, tells the story of a young man caught between his work for the French Gestapo, his work for a Resistance cell, and the black…

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American Wine: A Coming-of-Age Story

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The underdog story of how the United States came to dominate fine wine From the author of The Audacity of Hops: The History of America’s Craft Beer Revolution comes the triumphant tale of how America belted France from atop its centuries-old pedestal as the world’s top wine-producing and -drinking nation. Until the mid-1970s, American fine wine was an international also-ran. Then a series of events and a group of individuals changed everything forever. This is that story. All the big players and milestones are here, from the Judgment of Paris and the French Paradox to Julia Child and Robert Parker. Told in a fast-moving, engaging style free of wine jargon, it is the first of its kind: a book focused solely on…

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The Prisoners of Breendonk: Personal Histories from World War II Concentration Camp

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Award-winning author and retired college professor James M. Deem reveals never-before-published photographs and survivor accounts in a look at one of the lesser-known concentration camps during the Holocaust in The Prisoners of Breendonk: Personal Stories from a World War II Concentration Camp (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, August 4, 2015). While it was never designated an official concentration camp—instead, it was called a “reception” camp—it was no less brutal. Resembling a small castle, Fort Breendonk was originally used to protect Antwerp, Belgium from possible German invasion. It was damaged in World War I and fell into disrepair until German soldiers overtook it in 1940. The Nazis used the old fort to hold prisoners in transit. It soon became one of the most horrific…

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Legacy of Kings

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Imagine a time when the gods turn a blind eye to the agony of men, when the last of the hellions roam the plains, and evil stirs beyond the edges of the map. A time when cities burn, and in their ashes, empires rise. Alexander, Macedon’s sixteen-year-old heir, is on the brink of discovering his fated role in conquering the known world, but finds himself drawn to a newcomer… Katerina must navigate the dark secrets of court life while keeping hidden her own mission: kill the queen. But she doesn’t account for her first love… Jacob will go to unthinkable lengths to win Katerina, even if it means having to compete with Hephaestion, a murderer sheltered by the prince. And far across the…

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Wilber’s War: An American Family’s Journey through World War II

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A father’s odyssey. A mother’s strength. A son’s story. The trilogy, Wilber’s War, chronicles the story of two ordinary Americans, Wilber and Norma Bradt, during an extraordinary time, World War II. It offers fresh insight-on a deeply personal level-into the historic conflict as it was fought by the U.S. Army in the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, and The Philippines and by a family on the home front. It is an epic tale of duty, heroism, love, and human frailty. The story is told in large part in Wilber’s own words in a sensitive editing of his some 700 richly detailed wartime letters. The work spotlights the ways in which individuals shaped, and were shaped by, World War II. It offers…

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The Christianity Myth

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In his new book The Christianity Myth, K. A. G. Thackerey examines what little we know about first-century Christianity. He concludes that there are two ways of explaining how Christianity started. One way is the traditional way, with divine intervention, and the other way is Thackerey’s way, without divine intervention. Thackerey’s way is both novel and intriguing, and his very provocative ideas are destined to ruffle more than just a few feathers. The Christianity Myth is a very controversial, eye-opening expose that challenges Christianity’s very essence, and both Christians and non-Christians alike will find it a riveting read.   Meet the Author K.A.G THACKEREY was born of working-class parents in 1941. He had a good all-round education at a local…

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