Dangerous Love: A True Story of Tragedy, Faith, and Forgiveness in the Muslim World

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Shortly after 9/11, RAY NORMAN, a national director for World Vision’s poverty reduction program in Mauritania, and his daughter Hannah were driving to the beach when an Arab man opened fire on his parked car, severely wounding him and his daughter. After their recoveries the family made the extraordinary decision to stay in Mauritania, to maintain their commitment to the poor in their community, and to forgive the man who had hurt them. Dangerous Love demonstrates how God can use ordinary people, care for them in times of tragedy and heartbreak, and fulfill his own purposes in remarkable ways. Meet the Author RAY NORMAN is the director for Faith Leadership, Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at World Vision International and former national director…

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The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic

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Born Betsy Bowen into grinding poverty, the woman who reinvented herself as Eliza Jumel was raised in a brothel, indentured as a servant, and confined to a workhouse when her mother was in jail. Seizing opportunities and readjusting facts to achieve the security and status she so desperately craved, she obtained a fortune from her first husband, a French merchant, and nearly lost it to her second, the notorious vice president Aaron Burr. Divorcing Burr promptly amid lurid charges of adultery, she lived on triumphantly to the age of ninety, astutely managing her property and public persona. By the end of her life, “Madame Jumel” was one of New York’s richest women, with servants of her own, an art collection,…

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The Video Game Debate: Unravelling the Physical, Social, and Psychological Effects of Video Games

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Do video games cause violent, aggressive behavior? Can online games help us learn? When it comes to video games, these are often the types of questions raised by popular media, policy makers, scholars, and the general public. In this collection, international experts review the latest research findings in the field of digital game studies and weigh in on the actual physical, social, and psychological effects of video games. Taking a broad view of the industry from the moral panic of its early days up to recent controversies surrounding games like Grand Theft Auto, contributors explore the effects of games through a range of topics including health hazards/benefits, education, violence and aggression, addiction, cognitive performance, and gaming communities. Interdisciplinary and accessibly written, The…

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The Fairy Tale Girl

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Based on the diaries Susan has kept since she was in her 20s, THE FAIRY TALE GIRL is book one of a two part series. Together the books are an illustrated memoir, charmingly designed in Susan’s style with her whimsical watercolors and personal photographs.  It’s an enchanting story of love and loss, mystery and magic that begins in a geranium-colored house in California, and ends up, like any good fairy tale, on the right side of the rabbit hole, in a small cottage in the woods on the New England Island of Martha’s Vineyard. THE FAIRY TALE GIRL humorously explores Susan’s journey as an artist and as a girl/woman, from the 1950s through the 1980s. In the first book of the series we get…

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My Wife Wants You to Know I’m Happily Married (American Lives)

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Modern manhood is confusing and complicated, but Joey Franklin, a thirtysomething father of three, is determined to make the best of it. In My Wife Wants You to Know I’m Happily Married, he offers frank, self-deprecating meditations on everything from male-pattern baldness and the balm of blues harmonica to Grand Theft Auto and the staying power of first kisses. He riffs on cockroaches, hockey, romance novels, Boy Scout hikes, and the challenge of parenting a child through high-stakes Texas T-ball. With honesty and wit, Franklin explores what it takes to raise three boys, succeed in a relationship, and survive as a modern man. My Wife Wants You to Know I’m Happily Married is an uplifting rumination on learning from the past and living…

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The Box Wine Sailors: Misadventures of a Broke Young Couple at Sea

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Amy and Jimmie were not sailors. Their experience included reading a few books, watching a couple of instructional videos, and sailing once a week for a year. They were land-lubberly, middle-class twentysomethings, audacious and in love. All they wanted was to be together and do something extraordinary. They quit their jobs, bought a boat that was categorically considered “too small” for ocean sailing, and left Portland, Oregon for the Sea of Cortez. The Box Wine Sailors tells the true story of a couple’s ramshackle trip down the coast, with all the exulting highs and terrifying lows of sailing a small boat on the Pacific. From nearly being rammed by a pair of whales on Thanksgiving morning and the terrifying experience…

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The Three-Year Swim Club

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The year was 1937, and for the first time in recent memory not one Islander was on the U.S. Olympic men’s swimming roster. After the memorialized Duke Kahanamoku retired, no swimmer from the Sandwich Isles had been trained to continue his legacy. But Maui schoolteacher and dreamer, Soichi Sakamoto, an ordinary man whose swimming abilities didn’t extend much beyond treading water, challenged a group of scruffy plantation kids full of moxie to swim upstream against the current of their circumstance.  The goal? To become Olympians. They faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The children, Japanese-American, were malnourished and barefoot, and had no pool; they trained in the filthy irrigation ditches that snaked down from the mountains into the sugar cane fields. They…

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Last Act: The Final Years and Emerging Legacy of Ronald Reagan

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His name in American politics is more cited than any other president. Both the Republican and Democratic parties are radically different today, mainly as a result of Ronald Reagan and the force of his ideas. No twentieth century president shaped the American political landscape so profoundly. Craig Shirley’s Last Act is the important final chapter in the life of Reagan that no one has thus far covered. It’s the kind of book that widens our understanding of American history and of the presidency and the men who occupied it. To tell Reagan’s story, Craig has secured the complete, exclusive, and enthusiastic support of the Reagan Foundation and Library and spent considerable time there reviewing sealed files and confidential information. Cast in…

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Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City

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Two-time New York City police commissioner Ray Kelly opens up about his remarkable life, taking us inside fifty years of law enforcement leadership, offering chilling stories of terrorist plots after 9/11, and sharing his candid insights into the challenges and controversies cops face today. The son of a milkman and a Macy’s dressing room checker, Ray Kelly grew up on New York City’s Upper West Side, a middle-class neighborhood where Irish and Puerto Rican kids played stickball and tussled in the streets. He entered the police academy and served as a marine in Vietnam, living and fighting by the values that would carry him through a half century of leadership-justice, decisiveness, integrity, courage, and loyalty. Kelly soared through the NYPD…

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Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad

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National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson delivers a brilliant and riveting account of the Siege of Leningrad and the role played by Russian composer Shostakovich and his Leningrad Symphony. In September 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history—almost three years of bombardment and starvation that culminated in the harsh winter of 1943–1944. More than a million citizens perished. Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, their relatives having neither the means nor the strength to bury them. Residents burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and—eventually—one another to stay alive. Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet…

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The Light of the World: A Memoir

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A deeply resonant memoir for anyone who has loved and lost, from acclaimed poet and Pulitzer Prize finalist Elizabeth Alexander.   In THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD, Elizabeth Alexander finds herself at an existential crossroads after the sudden death of her husband. Channeling her poetic sensibilities into a rich, lucid price, Alexander tells a love story that is, itself, a story of loss. As she reflects on the beauty of her married life, the trauma resulting from her husband’s death, and the solace found in caring for her two teenage sons, Alexander universalizes a very personal quest for meaning and acceptance in the wake of loss.   THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD is at once an endlessly compelling memoir and a…

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Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre: A Biography of the Doors

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Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it’s not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn’t Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robby Krieger. It wasn’t Jim who saw a bright, acid-flared future for the band but keyboardist Ray Manzarek. And so, the band that started out as the “American Rolling Stones,” noted for their wildly unpredictable performances, their jazzy vibe, and the crazed monologues of their front man, ended as badly as did the…

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B & Me: A True Story of Literary Arousal

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A funny, frisky, often outrageous book about love, literature, and modern life—and a wink of the eye toU and I, Nicholson Baker’s classic book about John Updike—by an award-winning author called “wonderfully bright” by The New York Times Book Review. Nearly twenty-five years ago, Nicholson Baker published U and I, the fretful and handwringing—but also groundbreaking—tale of his literary relationship with John Updike. U and I inspired a whole sub-genre of engaging, entertaining writing about reading, but what no story of this type has ever done is tell its tale from the moment of conception, that moment when you realize that there is a writer out there in the world that you must read—so you read them. B & Me is…

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Master of Thin Air: Life and Death on the World’s Highest Peaks

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For readers of Into Thin Air, riveting high-altitude drama and the passion and drive that inspire outsized mountaineering achievements. Master of Thin Air opens with a fall that the author very nearly could not stop down an almost vertical rock ramp leading to a three-thousand-foot drop. The qualities that saved him then on K2—in addition to his mountaineering know-how and sheer good luck—drove his sixteen-year journey to summit all of the world’s eight-thousanders, the fourteen peaks that exceed 8,000 meters (26,000-plus feet) and take climbers into the death zone. Incredibly, he accomplished that feat without the aid of bottled oxygen for every mountain but one. By preference, he climbed solo or in small teams, without Sherpas. During twenty-three expeditions, he…

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Paid For

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An astonishingly brave memoir of prostitution and its lingering influence on a woman’s psyche and life. “The best work by anyone on prostitution ever, Rachel Moran’s Paid For fuses the memoirist’s lived poignancy with the philosopher’s conceptual sophistication. The result is riveting, compelling, incontestable. Impossible to put down. This book provides all anyone needs to know about the reality of prostitution in moving, insightful prose that engages and disposes of every argument ever raised in its favor.” ―Catharine A. MacKinnon, law professor, University of Michigan and Harvard University Meet the Author Born into a troubled family, RACHEL MORAN left home at the age of fourteen. Being homeless, she was driven into prostitution to survive. With intelligence and empathy, she describes…

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The Prisoners of Breendonk: Personal Histories from World War II Concentration Camp

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Award-winning author and retired college professor James M. Deem reveals never-before-published photographs and survivor accounts in a look at one of the lesser-known concentration camps during the Holocaust in The Prisoners of Breendonk: Personal Stories from a World War II Concentration Camp (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, August 4, 2015). While it was never designated an official concentration camp—instead, it was called a “reception” camp—it was no less brutal. Resembling a small castle, Fort Breendonk was originally used to protect Antwerp, Belgium from possible German invasion. It was damaged in World War I and fell into disrepair until German soldiers overtook it in 1940. The Nazis used the old fort to hold prisoners in transit. It soon became one of the most horrific…

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