Author

Jordan Foster - page 3

Jordan Foster has 43 articles published.

Jordan is a freelance writer living in Portland, Oregon, after spending six years in NYC for college and graduate school (where she earned her MFA in Fiction Writing from Columbia) before realizing that her heart belonged in the Pacific Northwest. She (hopefully) puts that degree to good use writing for BookTrib and Publishers Weekly about the vast quantity of books she reads. While Jordan’s literary diet is largely crime fiction—as she was raised, often literally, in Portland’s only mystery bookstore—she’s perfectly content to read novels and nonfiction that lack a murder because good writing transcends labels. Follow her on Twitter @jordanfoster13.

Screen romances for all your moods

in Romance by

Nothing says “I love you” like watching someone you don’t know (i.e. a movie star) say it to someone else you don’t know (as in, another movie star). But we fall in love at the movies, with the movies, and sometimes we wish we could break the celluloid barrier and join (or break up) a happy couple. And luckily the silver screen gives us romance in all its forms, so here (in chronological order to avoid squabbling over rankings) is a 14-piece starter kit for your movie romance. If you’re into unrequited love, sweeping (fake) shots of Atlanta burning at the hand of those damn Yankees, and a heroine as feisty as they come, try Gone with the Wind (1939).…

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Need a date (or want to stay single)? Open a book.

in Fiction by

Literature is rife with romantic prospects, as well as those people your mother would tell you to avoid at all costs. When you’re sitting at home, staring at your bookshelf this Valentine’s Day, consider these fictional characters who would arguably make a better (or infinitely worse) date than that one you’re either preparing (or wishing) for. There’s someone here for everyone. Let’s start with the ones in the plus column.     Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy (Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice): Everyone’s (or at least most people’s) favorite eligible Austen man, Mr. Darcy is the one you want if you’re into hate-at-first-sight that eventually blossoms into love.         Count Dracula (Bram Stoker’s Dracula): A less obvious choice, but…

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Why isn’t everyone listening to Mindy Kaling?

in Non-Fiction by

Mindy Kaling wonders if everyone is hanging out without her. No, Mindy, we’re all just wishing that you’d come hang out with us. You’re so cool when you tell us about not being cool. We wish we could be that cool. Instead, we’re happy to read about you. We think we might actually be getting cooler through osmosis (and we are sure that’s a thing). In her hilarious memoir Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), Kaling treats the introduction like a Q&A session, as if we’re standing in front of her, book in hand, weighing whether or not to buy it. (The answer to that question, by the way, is yes.) The imaginary, questioning reader wonders if…

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Here’s to you, Mr. Mailer

in Fiction by

It’s high praise when Joan Didion declares you the only person capable of writing a particular story. This is a woman who knows from voice. In her review of Norman Mailer’s 1979’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Executioner’s Song, Didion says, “I think no one but Mailer could have dared this book. The authentic Western voice, the voice heard [here], is one heard often in life but only rarely in literature.” Mailer, who died in 2007 at age 84, helped spearhead a movement known as “new journalism,” a term often used to describe the work of Truman Capote and Tom Wolfe, wherein the storytelling techniques of a novel are grafted on to real life. It’s not quite fiction and it’s not…

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Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. with a day of service

in Non-Fiction by

Many of you don’t have to go to work today. Sure, that’s great, sleep in if you like. But when you get up, think about giving back this MLK Day. While the government’s healthcare website might be finicky at best, its site dedicated to this National Day of Service (did you know that existed?) is excellent and lets you pinpoint volunteer opportunities within your community. Check out http://mlkday.gov/serve/find.php to find a project in your area that touches your heart. If you need inspiration, look no further than the man of the day, who underscored to us that “life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘what are you doing for others?’” This is the 20th anniversary of the day we observe…

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Looking for Heffalumps: life lessons from Winnie the Pooh

in Potpourri by

All of us want an exciting name all to ourselves. Even stuffed bears from Harrod’s in London, who started out life as Edward Bear under the trusted care of one Christopher Robin. And so Edward became Pooh and Pooh became legend. There are few symbols of childhood as universally recognizable as Winnie the Pooh and his posse from the Hundred Acre Wood. And today the gang’s creator, A. A. Milne, turns a whopping 134 years old. As Pooh would say, “many happy returns of the day.” Between 1924 and 1928, Milne wrote four collections featuring Pooh and friends, many of the titles as indelible today as they were in the roaring twenties: When We Were Young (1924), Winnie-the-Pooh (1926), Now…

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Holmes, our game is now afoot

in Fiction by

“Eliminate all other factors,” that most famous of detectives once said, “and the one that remains must be the truth.” Sherlock Holmes first appeared over 125 years ago and, a federal judge recently ruled, he’s here to stay. In fact, he could even stay at your house and you could write a story about it. The rights to the great logician, his loyal chronicler Dr. John Watson, and the villainous Moriarity are now in the public domain, meaning that the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Estate may no longer demand a licensing fee should you want to write a book about Holmes solving the disappearance of your puppy. According to U.S. copyright law, the fifty stories and novels Doyle published before…

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The madame and her Frenchman

in Fiction by

December 12th marked the 192nd birthday of French novelist Gustave Flaubert, best known for his tale of the perpetually unhappy titular housewife, Madame Bovary (1857). Emma Bovary, the sexually repressed and generally unpleasant focal point of the novel, is glumly married to the rather boring local doctor and spends the book longing and scheming for the passion, ecstasy, and luxury she’s experienced only in books. Like any good heroine doomed to go down in flames (paging Anna Karenina), Madame B. has her share of affairs, accumulates substantial debt, before—spoiler alert—ending it all with arsenic, much as Edith Wharton’s Lily Bart would do nearly half a century later in The House of Mirth, albeit with a popular “sleeping aid” made of choral hydrate. But both are…

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Go to the post office or write a novel?

in Fiction by

Let’s guess what you did today. Did it involve long lines at a) the post office, b) any store that sells items that are gift-able (not gift-worthy, just physically able to be purchased, wrapped, and presented as a holiday token) or c) both? Perhaps the only lines you accrued were the number of purchases now pending on your credit card statement, after you spent the day surfing the Internet and buying things for other people (and yourself, because, well, you deserve it after all that website navigation). Now, let’s take a look back at what some familiar names accomplished on this date in years past . Because, really, the holidays are all about comparing how cool your new toy is versus…

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Tattoos are forever

in Fiction by

Remember that Swedish girl, the one with the tattoos? She’s back. Or at least she will be in 2015. No one needs to be reminded how many copies the dearly departed Swede Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy have sold (millions) or in how many languages you can read about the adventures of star hacker Lisbeth Salander and occasionally disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist (here’s a hint: how many states are in the Union?). Don’t forget the film versions, bringing audiences Scandinavian moodiness in two languages and deeply dividing book fans into competing (Swedish) Noomi Rapace and (American) Rooney Mara camps. A decade after The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo came out in Sweden, back when Larsson was an unknown (and, unfortunately, also…

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Move over Amazon, the Brits are in the sky race

in Potpourri by

Before Amazon’s delivery drones even take flight, they’ll have some competition from across the pond. The competitors won’t be as shiny, or as easily wrangled, but they are programmed to fly. The British bookstore chain Waterstones announced on their website the launch of a new delivery system, O.W.L.S. (Ornithological Waterstones Landing Service). Introduced in the clip below by their aptly named press manager Jon Owls, this service “consists of a fleet of specially trained owls that, either working individually or as an adorable team, will be able to deliver your package within thirty minutes of you placing your order.” For those of you who have the tendency to lump all things British into a Hogwarts-sized heap, O.W.L.S. should not be…

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