Author

Jordan Foster - page 2

Jordan Foster has 43 articles published.

Jordan is a freelance writer living in Portland, Oregon, after spending six years in NYC for college and graduate school (where she earned her MFA in Fiction Writing from Columbia) before realizing that her heart belonged in the Pacific Northwest. She (hopefully) puts that degree to good use writing for BookTrib and Publishers Weekly about the vast quantity of books she reads. While Jordan’s literary diet is largely crime fiction—as she was raised, often literally, in Portland’s only mystery bookstore—she’s perfectly content to read novels and nonfiction that lack a murder because good writing transcends labels. Follow her on Twitter @jordanfoster13.

Jonesin’ for a Fix: Books for TV Addicts — Longmire edition

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Despite being unexpectedly cancelled by A&E after three seemingly successful seasons, there’s still hope for Sheriff Walt Longmire and Absaroka County, Wyoming. Insiders report that the Longmire team is preparing pitches for possible suitors, chief among them Netflix (a logical choice because the first two seasons—and soon the third—are already streaming on the site) and Amazon, though traditional cable networks like TNT and AMC will probably also be courted. But while fans wait (in between bouts of tweeting and retweeting #LongLiveLongmire) for the show’s fate to be decided, here are some book ideas to pass the time until Walt returns. If you just like everything about Longmire… There’s nothing better to get you through this bout of Longmire-us interruptus than…

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The case for place: fall mystery reads where location is key

in Fiction by

Now that summer’s over, it’s a good time to catch up—courtesy of a great new mystery or thriller—on all that traveling you never got around to. BookTrib has sifted through the plethora of fall books and chosen four featuring fascinating locales, be they a broken-down Detroit, a World War II-era Los Angeles or an English seaside village. When you’re finished with these must-reads, you might be less likely to kick at a pile of autumn leaves during your travels—there could be a corpse underneath. Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes (Mulholland, Sept. 16. 2014) Set in a contemporary, crumbling Detroit, Beukes’s fourth novel (following her breakout 2013 hit The Shining Girls) plunges readers into a terrifying mix of crime and the…

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SUMMER READS 2014: Chilling mysteries to beat the summer heat

in Thrillers by

It’s hot. You’re sweaty, even sitting next to the pool or on a blanket on a nice beach somewhere. Luckily, your bag—and if you’re like so many of us at BookTrib, your reading material outweighs everything else—is full of opportunities to escape the oppressive temperatures with some good, old-fashioned suspense, the kind that makes cold sweat run down the back of your neck. These six thrilling summer reads will be like ice cubes to your nerves. Just remember, BookTrib is not responsible for any sleepless nights. Suspicion by Joseph Finder (Dutton, May 27) The moral of Finder’s adrenaline-fueled ride is simple: don’t accept money from strangers. Especially large sums of money from very powerful, and very shady, men. Single dad…

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NPR’s Alan Cheuse on writing without a net and what to read this summer

in Non-Fiction by

Known as the “voice of books” on NPR, Alan Cheuse is the author of five novels and four collections of short fiction, most recently An Authentic Captain Marvel Ring (Santa Fe Writers Project, April). BookTrib had the opportunity to talk to Cheuse about his writing process, the power of short stories, and, of course, his book recommendations. How do you separate the job of talking about books from your own writing? I understand that what we call normal people, or “civilians,” work all day doing things that don’t allow them the pleasure of reading, so in the evenings they want to curl up with a good book. But that’s when I’m turning my movies on. As I see it, my…

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The secret language of twins: Matthew Dickman and Michael Dickman talk poetry

in Potpourri by

Matthew and Michael Dickman share more than just DNA. The identical twins are also award-winning poets who call Portland, Oregon home. Matthew is the author of All-American Poem (American Poetry Review, 2008) and Mayakovsky’s Revolver: Poems (Norton, 2012). Michael’s work includes The End of the West (Copper Canyon, 2009) and Flies (Copper Canyon, 2011); the brothers collaborated on the 2012 collection 50 American Plays, a book of poem-plays about all 50 states. In honor of National Poetry Month, BookTrib had the pleasure of speaking with Matthew and Michael about poetry, siblings, and all things art. What poem has resonated the most for you over the years? Would your answer have been different five, ten years ago? Matthew: One of the…

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Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

in Fiction by

“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

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Pocket guide to ten must-see movies at the Tribeca Film Festival

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Founded in 2002 to revitalize the section of lower Manhattan struggling in the wake of 9/11, the Tribeca Film Festival—the brainchild of Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal, and Craig Hatkoff—is now one of the country’s preeminent cinema showcases along with Sundance and Telluride. It’s probably physically impossible to see every film screening at the festival—in 2014, nearly 200 films will be shown—so BookTrib has created a pocket guide to the festival. So grab your program, your plane ticket to the Big Apple (if you’re not there already), and get ready to hunker down for some fascinating flicks. What to watch if you love Catcher in the Rye: GABRIEL In Lou Howe’s feature-length debut, Rory Culkin—yes, Macaulay’s younger brother—plays the titular…

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Are you there, Judy? It’s us, your fans

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As National Library Week draws to a close, BookTrib had the pleasure of talking to bestselling authors Laura Lippman and Megan Abbott about the importance of libraries and especially about the role this year’s Honorary Chair, Judy Blume, in their lives as writers and readers. Lippman’s current novel, After I’m Gone, is out now and Abbott’s next book, The Fever, will be out in June. When did you get your first library card? Do you still have it? Laura Lippman: My first library card was earned at the Garrison branch of the Baltimore City library system (aka the Enoch Pratt) after I learned to write my name, a la Rufus Moffat. I think you had to surrender the old one…

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Remembering the master of magical realism

in Fiction by

Though he was 87 when he died, it seems somehow inconceivable that the passing of Nobel Prize winning novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez isn’t just a wrinkle in the rich, malleable fabric of one his tales of magical realism. And yet, just like in his 1967 masterwork One Hundred Years of Solitude (translated into English in 1970), history inevitably repeats itself and death is one such repetition we must endure, though in Solitude’s fictional Macondo, ghosts and spirits remain to accompany the living. It would be fitting that of all the writers to leave this earth that Garcia Marquez, the consummate blender of magic and reality, would stick around in some form or another. In the meantime, this is the perfect…

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Poetry Month celebrates 100th birthdays of three great poets

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Some people dread birthdays but for three of poetry’s most well-known voices, 2014 is a year to celebrate. Octavio Paz, William Stafford, and Dylan Thomas would all turn 100 this year. Though none of the three lived to blow out a century’s worth of candles—Paz died at 84 in 1998, Stafford at 79 in 1993, and Thomas at 39 in 1953—their work lives on. And since April is National Poetry Month, it’s the perfect time to discover new voices in verse. To help you get acquainted with these three talented centenarians, BookTrib offers you a quick guide to each of these wholly unique voices and suggests where to start your reading journey. Octavio Paz The quick biography A native of Mexico,…

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Twenty years after Kurt Cobain: Five things you should know about the grunge legend

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It’s one of the most iconic album covers of the late 20th century: bright blue water, naked baby, floating money. Nevermind was Nirvana’s breakthrough album, the one that catapulted them—and particularly frontman Kurt Cobain—from a mostly unknown Pacific Northwest grunge band (and there were a lot of those) to a worldwide musical sensation. On April 5, 2014, it will be twenty years since Cobain killed himself. And yet his legacy burns on. On April 10, 2014, Nirvana will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame. Here are five things that you might not (but should) know about the talented lead singer, along with five iconic Nirvana videos to watch, either for the first time or in honor…

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Disappearance in the jungle: Carl Hoffman on the vanishing of Michael Rockefeller

in Non-Fiction by

In 1961, Michael Rockefeller, the 23-year-old son of one of the richest and most powerful men in America, vanished off the coast of New Guinea. In his thrilling new book Savage Harvest (Morrow, March), veteran journalist Carl Hoffman (The Lunatic Express) retraces Rockefeller’s steps and comes to startling conclusions about the ultimate fate of Nelson Rockefeller’s son. Before his reading at Portland, Oregon’s Powell’s Books, Hoffman sat down with BookTrib to discuss the book and the journey it took to write it. Publishers Weekly calls Savage Harvest “an expertly told tale that is begging for a film adaptation,” while Kirkus says Hoffman’s “searching, discomfiting journey yields an elegant, memorable report.” Did you start the project thinking that you’d ultimately solve…

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Ten most memorable lines from literature by female authors

in Fiction by

In this second installment of BookTrib’s continuing series that aims to bring you, dear reader, 50 of the most memorable lines in literature, you’ll have lots of fodder for those late-night trivia sessions at the bar. Or just some pithy responses to everyday questions. How do you work classic literature into your daily life? And, as always, we welcome your suggestions in the comments. Books and the literary lifestyle thrive when shared. As an added bonus, since 2014 is the Year of Reading Women, this week’s installment offers ten brilliant gems from women writers.   1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Advice as easily applicable as to writing as it is to how we live our lives, Atticus…

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My dear, you SHOULD give a damn

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Lists are everywhere. Books are everywhere. So it makes sense that lists about books are omnipresent. There are lists of the best books ever written, the worst books ever written, the books you should read before you die, the books you should read to make sure you never die (immortal vampires, anyone?), and everything in between. I hate to be the one to break it to you that it is impossible for you to read all the books currently in publication, let alone the thousands coming down the pike. Even with that new-fangled app that purports to let you read a novel in 90 minutes (that’s a gripe for another time), you simply won’t get to turn every page of…

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To Harriet, on her 50th birthday: contemporary writers reflect on the influence of HARRIET THE SPY

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In the beginning, there were stories. Always stories. And with stories come writers. So begins Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 classic, Harriet the Spy:    Harriet was trying to explain to Sport how to play Town. “See, first you make up the name of the town. Then you write down the names of all the people who live in it. You can’t have too many or it gets too hard. I usually have twenty-five.”    “Ummmmm.” Sport was tossing a football in the air. They were in the courtyard of Harriet’s house on East Eighty-seventh Street in Manhattan.    “Then when you know who lives there, you make up what they do. For instance, Mr. Charles Hanley runs the filling station on…

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Grimm Tales: just call Child Protective Services already

in Fiction by

 Maybe the name should clue you in. The stories collected by those cheery 19th century brothers German brothers, Jacob and Wilhelm (whose birthday it is today—he’d be 218), were the kind that taught children a lesson. Usually a bloody lesson about the perils of misbehaving. But over time, they’ve become known as “fairy tales,” with all the sweetness such a title implies. The recent NBC show Grimm seems to get the tone right, though: these are stories about things that most definitely go bump in the night. Here’s how modern audiences might react if regaled afresh—having no knowledge of the centuries-old originals—with three classic children’s tales collected and conjured up in the land of the Grimms.   Rapunzel Scenario: In…

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