Business behemoths Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple might help us keep costs down but do they take away our freedom, and what can we do about it?

Roxanne recently sat down with technology law expert and professor Tim Wu at his Columbia University office in New York City to discuss his latest book The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age (Columbia Global Reports) which examines the history of antitrust actions in the 20th century, making the argument that breaking up today’s largest high-tech titans would be good for business as well as our democracy.

Roxanne says, “in the short, persuasive, provocative, and historically grounded book, Tim shows us how allowing unrestricted growth of concentrated private power can feed an appetite for nationalist and even extremist leadership.”


The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age is available for purchase.

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ABOUT TIM WU:

Tim Wu is the Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology at Columbia Law School.  Wu joined the Law School in 2006 and teaches antitrust, copyright, the media industries, and communications law. He is the author of, among other works, “Network Neutrality Broadband Discrimination” (2003), Who Controls the Internet (2006), The Master Switch (2010), The Attention Merchants (2016), and The Curse of Bigness (forthcoming, November 2018). 

Wu was a law clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer and Judge Richard Posner, and has also worked at the White House National Economic Council, at the Federal Trade Commission, for the New York Attorney General, and in the Silicon Valley telecommunications industry. He has written widely for the popular press and is currently a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Wu has testified before Congress on multiple occasions, has been named twice to the Politico 50 list of those transforming American politics, and was also named one of America’s 100 most influential lawyers by the National Law Journal. He has twice won the Lowell Thomas Award for travel writing, and in 2017 he was named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.