Sex, Voyeurism, A Legendary Journalist And The Thin Line Between Fact And Fantasy

Image courtesy of hamptonsfilmfest.org

Ever go to a hotel and wonder if anyone is watching you? Voyeur, a documentary shown this weekend at the Hamptons Film Festival about well-known journalist Gay Talese and motel owner Gerald Foos, the voyeur who chose him to write his story.

It started more than thirty years earlier when Foos wrote a letter to Talese. Foos owned a small motel in Aurora Colorado that he turned into a laboratory designed specifically to spy on his clientele.

In April, 2016 a controversial excerpt from Talese’s upcoming book The Voyeur’s Motel was published  in The New Yorker. Just before the book’s release, The Washington Post ran a story stating the book had factual inconsistencies threatening to destroy the story Talese was working on for over three decades.

Voyeur is brilliantly directed by Myles Kane and Josh Koury and produced by Trisha Koury.  A small scale model of the motel was built to help tell the story and show how the observation deck was created adding a frighteningly surreal creepy element. “Voyeur” is a Netflix original documentary, in association with Impact Partners, produced by Brooklyn Underground Films, it airs on December 1.

Here’s a clip from Voyeur.


Next up the new documentary from Netflix about author Joan Didion called “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.”  Joan Didion is one of America’s most respected and celebrated authors including her award-winning memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking.

As reported in Variety, the new film is directed by her nephew Griffin Dunne and includes footage of Didion partying with Janis Joplin in a house full of L.A. rockers; hanging out with Jim Morrison in a recording studio; and cooking dinner for one of Charles Manson’s women for a magazine story.

“Joan Didion” will launch Oct. 27 and is produced by Griffin Dunne, Mary Recine and Annabelle Dunne.

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