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A Man of Genius by Lynn Rosen

719mhKqDYOLSamuel Grafton-Hall is a man of genius who demands reverence from all. A renowned architect, his point of view is not universally shared by students, critics, and colleagues – but this is of little consequence to Grafton-Hall, for he revels in his misanthropy.

Immune to the barbs of the masses, Grafton-Hall also suffers no qualms about his personal peccadilloes and perversions. An unrepentant womanizer, Grafton-Hall leaves colleagues, friends, and lovers deeply scarred from having known him.

And then there is the murder. The question of guilt is of less consequence than the question of whether the gift of genius makes one irreproachable.

A rich novel that will sweep you into a life of glittering achievement and the core of hubris, A Man of Genius will forever alter your ideas about success and pride. Written in the haunting style of du Maurier’s Rebecca, this is a compelling story, told with intelligence and classic style.

Eye of the Beholder by Laura J. Snyder

51XUCmvsQ2L._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_The remarkable story of how an artist and a scientist in seventeenth-century Holland transformed the way we see the world.

On a summer day in 1674, in the small Dutch city of Delft, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek―a cloth salesman, local bureaucrat, and self-taught natural philosopher―gazed through a tiny lens set into a brass holder and discovered a never-before imagined world of microscopic life. At the same time, in a nearby attic, the painter Johannes Vermeer was using another optical device, a camera obscura, to experiment with light and create the most luminous pictures ever beheld.

“See for yourself!” was the clarion call of the 1600s. Scientists peered at nature through microscopes and telescopes, making the discoveries in astronomy, physics, chemistry, and anatomy that ignited the Scientific Revolution. Artists investigated nature with lenses, mirrors, and camera obscuras, creating extraordinarily detailed paintings of flowers and insects, and scenes filled with realistic effects of light, shadow, and color. By extending the reach of sight the new optical instruments prompted the realization that there is more than meets the eye. But they also raised questions about how we see and what it means to see. In answering these questions, scientists and artists in Delft changed how we perceive the world.

In Eye of the Beholder, Laura J. Snyder transports us to the streets, inns, and guildhalls of seventeenth-century Holland, where artists and scientists gathered, and to their studios and laboratories, where they mixed paints and prepared canvases, ground and polished lenses, examined and dissected insects and other animals, and invented the modern notion of seeing. With charm and narrative flair Snyder brings Vermeer and Van Leeuwenhoek―and the men and women around them―vividly to life. The story of these two geniuses and the transformation they engendered shows us why we see the world―and our place within it―as we do today.

Eye of the Beholder was named “A Best Art Book of the Year” by Christie’s and “A Best Read of the Year” byNew Scientist in 2015.  16 pages of color illustrations

The Heart of the Fight by Judith Wright, Bob Wright

51gP8G7DZjLEvery couple fights—it’show you fight that can determine the success of your relationship. This book teaches you to look beyond what you and your partner fight about, and discover the core issues that undermine your relationship.

In the midst of a disagreement, many couples ask themselves, “What are we really fighting about?” Sound familiar? As it turns out, breakups and divorce don’t happen because couples fight, they happen because of how couples fight. In this much-needed book, Judith and Bob Wright—two married counselors and coaches with over thirty years of experience helping couples learn how to fight well—present their tried-and-true methods for exploring the emotions that underlie many relationship fights.

In this unique guide, you’ll learn how to use disagreements as an opportunity to deepen your understanding of your partner, bring more intimacy to the relationship, strengthen your bond, and really learn from the conflicts and tensions that occur between you. You’ll also learn how to navigate the fifteen most common fights couples have, including “the blame game,” “dueling over dollars,” “If you really loved me, you’d…,” “told-you-so’s,” and more.

If you’re ready to start fighting for your love, rather than against it, this book will show you how.

The Great Good Thing by Klavan

5151yZ5V-vLHow did a New York–born, Jewish, former-atheist novelist and screenwriter—a winner of multiple Edgar Awards, whose books became films with Clint Eastwood and Michael Douglas—find himself at the age of fifty being baptized and confessing Jesus as Lord? That’s a tale worth telling.

From his childhood outside New York City, through his years as college-dropout wanderer and on to his growing success as a writer, Andrew Klavan consumed stories. From novels and plays to movies and the Bible, literature helped him interpret the world and understand his place in it. Dropping out of college to wander the country as an itinerant journalist, he met the woman who became his wife—and tales of marriage have been central to his writing ever since. Wrestling with severe depression that took him to the brink of suicide, his reading of Hamlet and even Freud became crucial life-giving supports. And lying in bed reading Patrick O’Brien’s seafaring tales, he found the courage to say a prayer—“thank you”—that overturned his life and led, inevitably, to his baptism in New York City a few days after his father’s memorial service. The stories of Western literature led Andrew Klavan to Jesus. This is Klavan’s story

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